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The typical working day of nine successful business leaders

When you’re leading a fast-growth business it can often be hard to prioritise and remain productive, so Real Business has found out how nine high flyers construct their typical working day.
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Chris Vincent, MD of V4 Woodflooring

ChrisVincent73What time do you get up, and why?

I get up with the family at 6.30am to help with getting the children ready for school.

What do you like to do with your time between getting up and leaving for the office?

Once I’ve done my family duties I go to a local café for a coffee and sit with my diary and phone and work out the day ahead.

How glued to technology are you in the morning?

Too much – but working with companies across the world emails come in at all times so I deal with the overnight ones in the morning.

How do you break up a typical working day, what do you find is important?

At the moment I don’t go into the office too much and work on my laptop in cafes – it works for me where the business is at the moment, building a whole new showroom and office base.

What unusual quirks do you have to ensure you’re productive and efficient?

I write everything down as soon as it happens or I think about it. I even have a note book next to the bed and jot things down in the middle of the night. That stops me forgetting things.

What personal time do you like to set aside, and why?

An hour with my personal trainer is time for me. The rest of my personal time is family orientated and I try and attend as many of the children’s activities as I can. And of course a weekly date night with my wife.

What tools (technological or otherwise) are useful for you?

My diary, note book and pen are not just useful but critical.

How do you try and switch off in the evening, if at all?

If only! I don’t ever switch off completely, even on holiday. I really wish I could.

What is your one mantra for a good work/life balance?

Never forget you are a dad and husband, as well as business owner.

If you could swap days with one person who would it be?

I’d love to be Duncan Bannatyne for a day. I aspire to reach his level of business acumen and want to know how he does it and what he does differently to me.

Keep reading to see why stepping away from technology works

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About Author

Hunter Ruthven

Hunter Ruthven is the editor of Real Business. He is also the editor of Business Advice, a title focused solely on a section of the business community currently underserved – micro companies. Alongside this, he is part of the team that hosts the Growing Business Awards, First Women Awards and Future 50 initiative.

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