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Peter Jones: Primary school children must be taught the art of entrepreneurship

According to Dragons’ Den investor Peter Jones, Britain’s business growth can be secured by teaching five-year-olds the way of entrepreneurship – particularly as the country is in the process of future planning for leaving the European Union.
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Jones wants to encourage a startup culture in youngsters in schools across the UK and wants to see their entrepreneurial skills unlocked so they may flourish in the enterprise world.

“As the UK embarks on an uncertain post-EU economic path we need to equip the next generation – from as young an age as possible – with the confidence, business acumen and practical skills they need to thrive,” said Jones.

“Our children will play a critical role in defining Britain’s future prosperity. I want to inspire children to ‘dream big’ and believe in their creative potential. We must do this across the country now by putting enterprise at the heart of the UK’s education system.”

Fellow entrepreneur and investor Richard Branson has slammed the Brexit and campaigned for Brits to vote remain. Unfortunately for him, this fell on deaf ears, but he has been increasingly vocal about the choice that has been made to leave the EU.

“If we carry on down the current path, we’re taking the country to a recession very rapidly,” he said at an impromptu press conference. “Young people, overwhelmingly, are telling me up until four days ago they could live and work in 28 countries – suddenly they’re restricted to one country.”

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Like Jones, Branson has also campaigned for young people to develop their skills, believing UK businesses would fall behind if digital education is neglected from schools.

The Dragon will be calling on primary schools to share his vision by signing up to his Tycoon in Schools competition. The free enterprise challenge will support children aged five to 12.

Adding his enthusiasm for youthful minds, Jones added: “Primary school children are naturally more creative and free-thinking than most adults. They are refreshingly honest, fearless and see things without boundaries.

“However, these entrepreneurial instincts are often tempered as they grow up and society conditions and constrains their thinking.”

Launched in 2012, Tycoon in Schools has seen 900 businesses created by youngsters, while they have received around £250,000 of startup loans.

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About Author

Zen Terrelonge

Zen Terrelonge is the deputy editor of Real Business, specialising in media, innovation, technology and the digital sector. A media professional with eight years worth of experience he has worked for both startup and established publications.

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