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Here are the eight pieces of jargon business leaders want to see killed off

Whether it is two words jammed together or just those that make very little sense, the SME community has let it be known what jargon has no right to exist.
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They are often used in presentations, when trying to patronise junior staff or as a way of covering up for the fact that you know very little. Buzzwords and jargon have become part and parcel of the business world, but which ones are loathed most?

Research compiled by Brand Learning has shed light on which examples business leaders believe are most overused in management. Here they are:

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(1) Transformation (24 per cent)

(2) Millennials (16 per cent)

(3) Disruption (11 per cent)

(4) Agility (nine per cent)

(5) Human Capital (eight per cent)

(6) Purpose (six per cent)

(7) Responsiveness (six per cent)

(8) Holacracy (one per cent)

Read more on the subject:

The findings were determined by quizzing 900 business leaders in 42 countries, accompanied by 70 interviews with CEOs and senior executives from the likes of Diageo, Microsoft and Dyson.

Mhairi McEwan, group CEO and co-founder of Brand Learning, said: “Businesses need to stop talking about human capital and start to involve their employees, and their suppliers for that matter as ‘humans’ – people with spirit; with intellectual, physical and emotional needs. It is time for leaders to move beyond pure financial control to embrace a more purposeful, value driven concept of growth.”

When asked what was most important in the pursuit of growth, the three most popular answers were the happiness of the customer (69 per cent), the talent and effectiveness of our people (64 per cent) and profit (53 per cent). Next in order of popularity were: revenue, shareholder value, the happiness of our people, positive social impact and positive environmental impact.

If you have a piece of jargon you think should be binned, but hasn’t been included, then get in touch via editors@realbusiness.co.uk.

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About Author

Hunter Ruthven

Hunter Ruthven is the editor of Real Business. He is also the editor of Business Advice, a title focused solely on a section of the business community currently underserved – micro companies. Alongside this, he is part of the team that hosts the Growing Business Awards, First Women Awards and Future 50 initiative.

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