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Disgruntled employees most likely to seek new jobs at the end of May

When it comes to seeking new jobs, it turns out that unhappy employees are most likely to begin the search for new jobs at the end of May.
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It could be a cold summer for businesses if British workers have their way. According to a survey completed by VoucherCodesPro, employees are most likely to look for new jobs on 28 May.

It’s been deemed the most common day of the year for the search, coinciding with many getting paid, while it’s also a bank holiday weekend, with the day off providing extra opportunity to seek new jobs.

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The 2,500 respondents were all in full-time work and had possessed new jobs at least once over the past two years. It was revealed that 79 per cent had put thought into their decision to look for work elsewhere, outpacing the spur of the moment approach.

Where length of time behind deciding to look for new jobs, 57 per cent had considered mobbing on for months, compared to 43 per cent that had been thinking about it for a matter of weeks.

In addition to the 28 May spike for the search of new jobs, September was also cited as a peak time for itchy feet, with many workers returning from summer holidays.

“It’s interesting to see the two key times of the year when Britons are most likely to consider moving jobs, especially with one of those taking place this month,” said George Charles, spokesperson for VoucherCodesPro.co.uk.

“It makes sense that companies are more likely going to be looking for staff following the start of the new tax year, and more budgets being made available, and this is the key time where Britons expect to receive a pay rise or even a bonus – not receiving one for two years, as this poll has shown, can be detrimental, especially when a business is doing well.”

The top five responses for looking for new jobs are:

(1) Looking for better pay – 47 per cent

(2) No career progression opportunities at my current role – 40 per cent

(3) Wanting more flexible hours – 31 per cent

(4) Felt unhappy and put it down to the job I was in – 25 per cent

(5) Struggling with management/colleagues – 14 per cent

With money a key motivator, the average length of time that had passed since receiving a pay rise to then look for a new role was two years, according to the study. With that in mind, an extra £2,500 annually is the amount that would convince workers to move into new jobs.

Image: Shutterstock

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Zen Terrelonge

Zen Terrelonge is the deputy editor of Real Business, specialising in media, innovation, technology and the digital sector. A media professional with eight years worth of experience he has worked for both startup and established publications.

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