AD

Apparently WiFi is more important than sex and chocolate

WiFi is undoubtedly regarded as valuable, but you’d be shocked what people thought WiFi is more important than – and the influence it has on our decisions.
AD

If anything our Real Business Broadband campaign has taught us is that WiFi is an integral part of business. But would it be the one thing you take with you in the “stranded on an island” scenario? Apparently so – WiFi is more important than quite a lot of things.

Gigi Engle, branded content strategist for Elite Daily, may have summed this up best, saying: “Everyone believes they want ‘love.’ No one wants to die alone, to spend their days in solitude with their 50 cats as their only company. Yet there is something much worse. Think of losing something so essential to your life you didn’t even realise you could face life without it. I am talking about the critical, insanely important relationship you have with your WiFi.

- Advertisement -

“If you don’t think WiFi is that pivotal to your life, let me paint a little picture for you. Close your eyes and try to fathom a world without Netflix, Google or Facebook. Attempt to visualise every single day devoid of Twitter, Instagram or your favourite aggregated news sites. You can’t, right? Being single is one thing, but living a life without WiFi would be like retreating back to the Dark Ages. It would be comparable to the days of cavemen.”

She’s not the only one to feel this way. iPass quizzed 1,700 people across the globe and found that WiFi was an essential, can’t do without “product” for 40 per cent of respondents. It was deemed higher than alcohol and a greater driving force than chocolate. Most of all, however, WiFi is more important than sex – 37 per cent of the globe’s inhabitants have spoken.

On the back of this research, we reached out to a few business owners to gauge what else WiFi is more important than.

For Sammy Blindell, founder of How To Build A Brand, WiFi is deemed paramount to running a business, especially when on the go. “Not being connected means that customers are not being served and that there’s disconnection amongst team members,” she said.

“I would say that for me, WiFi is more important than any type of transportation – plane, train or automobile. WiFi gives us the power to connect to those people important to our business in seconds…so we can build really good reasons to then hop on that aeroplane and grow our global brands.”

Paul Stallard, managing director at Berkeley, on the other hand, claimed Wifi is more important than television: “I rarely watch traditional TV anymore but couldn’t be without wifi to catch up on the morning news, social and Netflix!”

CGMA founder Sam Boothroyd even said: “WiFi is more important that keeping my wife happy! Wifi is so important I have taken a flight that was inconvenient to me and my family just because the airplane had wifi on it and I could get some work done!”

The latter coincides with the iPass research, which suggested people chose flights, hotels, and so much more, based on whether they would be getting WiFi.

It concluded: “Wi-Fi is changing the world for the better, faster than anyone ever expected. Whether mobile professionals are at home, travelling between client meetings, at their hotel on a business trip or even in-flight, they expect to remain connected and productive at all times, working and unwinding as they see fit, not as dictated by their internet connection.”

This article is part of our Real Business Broadband campaign, which seeks to provide a mouthpiece for business leaders to vocalise the broadband issues preventing their businesses from reaching full potential. We’d love to hear your take on the debate and where you think the UK needs to make drastic changes. Get in touch via email (shane.schutte@realbusiness.co.uk) or join in on the action using #rbBroadband.

Image: Shutterstock

Share with your network

Follow Real Business:

About Author

Shané Schutte

Shané Schutte is a senior reporter at Real Business, with a particular specialism in employment and business law, human resources, information technology and sales/marketing.

Real Business