Sales & Marketing

6 crazy - and cheap - places to advertise

3 min read

08 July 2013

If you're thinking about dipping into the promotional coffers for the first time or fancy something different to the tired old route of mail-shots and directory, local rag and local radio, try these ideas, from 1997, for size:

1. Taxi advertising– receipts or full livery

You can try anything from branded receipts to full exterior livery. Highly visual in town and city environment generating high levels of spontaneous recall. Furthermore, each advertisement comes with an added bonus… the cabby. Some companies have even paid cabbies to drop product and service names unto their conversations.

Who’s it for?

Taxi usage breaks down into 56 per cent business, 12 per cent eating out, ten per cent shopping and 22 per cent other. Their focussed clientele use taxis every six months. Thus the perfect advertisers are the upmarket car dealerships, hotels, luxury retailers and health farms. Also publishers, radio stations and employment agencies. Central London residents make 43 cab journeys a year each averaging 14 minutes, making it the principle market.

2. Aerial banner-towing – advertising in the sky

The medium is still somewhat in its infancy and remains an attention grabber. Low cost-per-head when exposed to large audiences at outdoor exhibitions, carnivals, country shows, sporting events, etc.

Who’s it for?

The sky’s the limit, really. Take an hour one Saturday afternoon and cover a city’s shopping centre, a Premiership football match and maybe a race meeting. Or what about flying over the M25 during morning rush hour. You’d reach 100,000 stationary motorists.

3. Advertising on rental video covers

Although it was a huge market in 1997, the closing down of Blockbuster stores shows us that the video rental industry is in jeopardy. There are, however, still Briton’s who go to a physical store to rent DVDs.

Who’s it for?

Very much geared towards businesses from the leisure, food and entertainment sectors. Furthermore, Blockbuster employs certain guidelines and there’s no guarantee that they’ll carry every advertiser. Confectionary and leisure wear companies as well as off-licences and pizza outlets are well suited.

5. Tickets and receipts

They are all relatively cheap and highly targeted.

Who’s it for?

On bus tickets you usually find photo processing shops, dry cleaners, recruitment agencies and local stores. Supermarket receipts attract similar advertisers. Because of the nature of the medium, pay and display stickers attract anything to do with cars, but food outlets are popular too.

6. Golf paraphernalia – tiditees to ball washers

You can advertise on all manner of golf kit: golf scoring and yardage cards, “tiditees”, tee marker, ball washers, litter bins, driving ranges and in club houses. Golf guarantees a high socio-economic audience, plenty of repeat viewing – those executives love to play a round – and with over 2,500 golf courses in the UK, targeting isn’t a problem.

Who’s it for?

Professional companies such as accountants, solicitors, etc, garden centres, health clubs, jewellers and other luxury retailers. Also, osteopaths for those bad backs, and golf-related businesses; instructors, clothing and equipment suppliers.