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6 steps to writing irresistible proposals

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Or, to put it another way, how many presentations and proposals have you read that drone on for far too long?

Too many small companies pitching for client business too easily fall back on cramming in as much material as possible. But they should beware – when trying to win a deal, less is often more.

Don’t bombard the clients whose business you want. To close the deal, follow these six steps to efficient business communication – here is how to write an irresistible proposal.

1. Don’t run before you can walk

You wouldn’t board a train without knowing the destination. So don’t begin your proposal’s journey without first developing a clear plan. Without drafting your presentation, your proposal is likely to ramble aimlessly toward a tiring and confused conclusion.

So, before you touch the keyboard, write down the key points you want to sell in your presentation. Discuss the major required components of your pitch with colleagues, including your company’s key strengths and the main characteristics of your project commitment.

2. One man’s meat is another man’s poison

Everyone is unique, with our own opinions, past history and values. If that sounds like your own, special company, then, rest assured, it is also the case for your target client. So why do we keep on sending the same proposal, formulaic proposal, time and time again?

Your prospects deserve to be treated as individuals. Go over your presentation with a fine tooth comb to rip out generic statements and make client-specific commitments that make your targets feel they are being spoken with.

3. You catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar

Save your customer from a load of useless information. Don’t fall in the trap of stuffing the proposal with everything you know, including charts, numbers and corporate jargon. You only risk diluting your own message.

Instead, keep things simple. On every page, ask yourself: “Does this really need to go in?” Then ask again! Let yourself shine by including a few key points, not by throwing the kitchen sink at your prospective client.

CONTINUE READING ON PAGE TWO…

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