HR & Management

As CEO I always get involved with recruitment decisions

5 min read

15 February 2017

When a business grows the number of recruitment decision required also swells, but Giles Fuchs believes the CEO needs to maintain the same involvement.

In light of the promising outlook for our sector and our own ambitions to expand the business and to purchase new buildings this year, I have spent this month heavily involved in recruitment decisions across many different levels – looking for staff that will help us achieve this growth.

Despite grim economic forecasts, our sector in the UK has escaped relatively unharmed from the recent economic woes that have engulfed other industries, benefitting from the weakness of the pound and attracting growing levels of foreign investment.

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) has reported that the commercial property market is continuing to attract investor interest despite ongoing concerns about pricing in the capital and prospects for the economy more generally. As we move further into the first quarter of the year, I feel optimistic about what the coming months hold for Office Space in Town.

This month, I have participated in recruitment decisions in every division of the business. It doesn’t matter whether we are recruiting for a receptionist or a manager, I strongly believe that as a CEO I should be involved with every recruitment process.

Many companies pride themselves on the strength of their staff, but not every CEO is personally involved in the recruitment and retention of staff. I believe that as a CEO I should be directly accountable for how the entire business runs – from the boardroom to the reception desk – and that means taking responsibility for the staff that we hire, which are ultimately responsible for the quality of experience and services our tenants receive.

All staff are the face of our company and have been key to our success. Moreover, as a CEO I am keen to mobilise a motivated workforce that is able to deliver an award-winning service and to provide a point of contact through all levels of the business.

Our business is only as good as our people and that is exactly the reason why we invest in our team. At Office Space in Town, our employees are well equipped with skills and knowledge, which enhance their job satisfaction and also help boost the productivity of the business.

When we started Office Space in Town we wanted to build a company that reflected who we were as people and the ethics and morals by which we live. We aspired to build and succeeded in establishing a business that is very focused on its staff, the service they provide and our clients.

Last year and in the first quarter of this year, Office Space in Town has continued to perform well and we are a business that continues to grow in spite of the economic uncertainties. In 2016, our revenue rose to £17.25m – a record for the company. Despite the Brexit vote, demand for flexible office spaces has in fact increased and we are well positioned to caplitalise on this trend.

Our people will always remain our greatest asset. We say it with good reason – it is only through the hard work and the co-operation of our team that we are able to serve our clients well and attract long-term investment.

In the coming months, we are committed to expanding and strengthening our portfolio and our growing client base. Presently we have six offices in central London but we plan to open a further four. However, our real capital doesn’t lie in the bricks and mortar of our buildings, but is with our people. Our staff will be crucial in delivering our growth plans and allowing us to expand in 2017 and this is why I am so personally involved in recruitment decisions at the business, as I know how vital their contribution is to our continued success.

If you’ve enjoyed Giles Fuchs’ thoughts on recruitment decisions, check out his other diary entries for Real Business.

This article is part of a wider campaign called Founders Diaries, a section of Real Business that brings together 20 inspiring business builders to share their stories. Bringing together companies from a wide variety of sectors and geographies, each columnist produces a diary entry each month. Visit the Founders Diaries section to find out more.