Opinion

Do you blame recruiters like job seekers do?

3 min read

03 April 2017

CV-Library questioned 1,000 workers and 700 recruiters to find out who was responsible for preparing candidates for interviews. While the former blame recruiters for their failings, it made us wonder whether bosses felt the same way.

Some 64.4 per cent of UK staff believe there’s not enough education around interview techniques. While many chalk this down to the education system, 15.2 per cent blame recruiters. Given how vocal the business world is about school leavers being unprepared for work, would bosses do the same?

Much corporate complaining revolves around the difficulty of hiring people – and is mostly directed at education. Without doubt, schools, colleges and universities are there to instil in the future workforce how to get by in life – an Ofsted report even argued that enterprise education, as was recommended by Lord Young in 2014, should be promoted. 

But we can’t expect such institutions to dedicate more time to the interview process when its true purpose is to bridge the skills gap. That’s where recruiters potentially come into the picture. Despite the wide choice of hiring methods available today, there remains a big demand for recruitment agencies – with a twist.

There’s a rising trend towards partnerships, whereby a business will hire staff from one agency, which will strive to deliver the talent they think will fit the vacant role best. This deal threatens to collapse if the perfect candidate walks out the door because they had no knowledge of the interview process. It definitely goes a long way in suggesting students are right to, in some way, blame recruiters for not preparing them.

In fact, 29.1 per cent of recruiters in the CV-Library report admitted they had more responsibility than schools and colleges (15 per cent) to ensure candidates were up to par with the interview process.

As was said by Lee Biggins, founder and managing director of CV-Library: “You want to make sure you’re getting the most out of candidates, especially as giving a weak interview could cost them the job – and that one perfect employee could unknowingly slip from your fingers.

“Being self-taught and having done some thorough research may work for some, but it’s clear the nation’s workers – and the bosses soon to employ them – would appreciate more support when it comes to understanding interviews.”

The corporate landscape has been shifting full-speed ahead, eradicating certain roles and bringing new challenges to the forefront. Perhaps one way of adapting is for the the recruiter to pass some knowledge on to candidates before they are thrown into the deep end. This way, when it comes to being in the hot seat in real life, Brits wouldn’t have to rely purely on charm – and they wouldn’t be able to blame recruiters for their faults.

While recruiters are obviously concerned with finding the right candidates and impressing clients, it’s also important to help workers by boosting their interview techniques.

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