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“Britain and Twitter not the same,” declares David Cameron

3 min read

07 October 2015

Former editor

As he set out to describe what can be expected from the remaining Conservative administration, prime minster David Cameron hit out against pollsters and social media commentators who declared he would not return to power and unveiled plans for a “Great British take-off” – that leaves no person behind.

At the Conservative conference in Manchester, Cameron took to the stage for 55 minutes and issued just short of 7,000 words.

He began by looking back to 7 May when he and his party secured re-election as part of a majority decision.

“Why did all the pollsters and the pundits get it so wrong?” he asked. “Because, fundamentally, they didn’t understand the people who make up our country. The vast majority of people aren’t obsessives, arguing at the extremes of the debate. Let me put it as simply as I can: Britain and Twitter are not the same thing.”

While the business agenda did not dominate his speech, Cameron did make a number of comments.

“Our belief in an enterprise economy – that if you set free the ambition that burns so deeply within the British people, they will strike out on their own, take on new workers, take on the world,” he said.

“We’ve got more foreign investment flooding into our country than anywhere else in Europe – anywhere in the world except for America and China.

“We still need to find savings and produce more; still need to become more competitive; still need to make the most of our entire country – and build the Northern Powerhouse.”

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Rounding on the Labour party and its new leader Jeremy Corbyn, Cameron sought to attack the party’s claims that the Conservatives are not providing policy for the poor.

“Who gets hurt when governments lose control of spending and interest rates go through the roof? Who gets hurt when you waste money on debt interest and have to cut the NHS? Who gets hurt when taxes go up and businesses start firing rather than hiring?

“No – not the rich – it’s poor people, working people.”

Declaring next year will see a “giant step forward” when it comes to salaries at the lower end of the scale, he added: “A new National Living Wage. Over £9 an hour by the end of the decade. An £80-a-week pay rise for the lowest paid. Work paying for millions of people.

“So let the message go out: if you work hard, want to get on, want more money at the end of the month, the party for you is right here.”

Rounding off he set out his direction for the UK. “A country raising its sights, its people reaching new heights. A Great British take-off – that leaves no-one behind.”