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Most business travellers return from trips with Adventurous” bedroom desires

Business Travellers
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The research of some 2,000 business travellers found that 61 per cent consider themselves to be ?more adventurous in the bedroom on their return?.

Luxury serviced apartment operator CitySuites is behind the study, which suggests that absence does, in fact, make the heart grow fonder.

Nichi Hodgson of the Inner Circle dating organisation, said: In reality, a harmonious domestic life comes at the expense of desire which requires novelty, distance, and an element of the unknown or unobtainable in order to flourish. Travel can provide the break you need in order to see one another with fresh eyes.

“The ideal of romantic love we are sold is of complete togetherness, with a partner who is not only socially, sexually, and intellectually compatible with us on every level, but also a soul mate, best friend, parent, PA, technician, cook, cleaner, and any number of other roles.

In addition to turning up the heat in the bedroom, 62 per cent of business travellers believe that jetting off is improving their relationships. They claim working away from home makes them appreciate loved ones more than when they left.

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“Taking a break from one another while doing something financially and personally empowering at work in a different environment spikes confidence, while being healthily separated and then reunited releases endorphins needed to make something feel novel, fresh and desirable again,” Hodgson continued.

“When you’re without someone, you stop focusing on the irritating details of who forgot to empty the dishwasher and have a chance to reminisce about their better qualities.

The findings from CitySuites also showed that business travellers from London are more likely to want a break to support their relationship, at 68.5 per cent. They?re also open to riskier bedroom behaviour, with a spike of 71 per cent.

In terms of age, 70 per cent of 25-34 year olds think time away would help relationships, dropping almost half to 40 per cent for over 55s.

Gavin Bailey, operations director at CitySuites, said: “It’s encouraging to see that working away from home might be helping to improve relationships and have some beneficial results to workers” wellbeing and home life!

“The negative connotations of a glamorous lifestyle and fractured home life that have surrounded business travel seem out-dated, and this research clearly echoes this.

?What we re seeing now is a much more accurate reflection of business travel, which is actually bringing loved ones closer together.

Image: Shutterstock

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