Opinion

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Common sense vs the compensation culture

3 Mins

At long last, reassurance for charitable workers, the police and fire fighters that they won’t run the risk of being sued in the course of their duties!

The report also went on to condemn accident victims, who are under the impression that they are entitled to handsome rewards for just making a claim, regardless of any personal responsibility.

We’re making good headway, but I think we would do well to ask Lord Young to spread his wings and look at other aspects where radical strategies could be brought in to reverse it.

The growth of the welfare state, however well intentioned originally, has had the effect of allowing to expect the state to provide if they choose not to – one of the biggest negations of personal responsibility.

The spread of the US habit of every man on the street suing anyone about anything is nothing short of repulsive. Having been at the receiving end of a catastrophic hospital error, I still don’t understand how years of litigation and the possibility of financial profit is going to make the emotional loss less devastating. I wonder how many of those cases would go ahead if the aim was purely investigative and there were no financial rewards involved.

On a day-to-day business level, in an economy where payment is hard enough to extract, people have now latched on to complaining on receipt of bill or statement as a means to obtain additional credit. Compensation is now produced daily on even the flimsiest of excuses.

An example from my company: we do not give set times for delivery but update customers on request as to driver’s progress. On a tube-strike day a few weeks back, our driver was some 20 minutes later than expected due to the extra traffic to deliver an order of (wait for it) three shelves. Immediately, the customer in question spat out the c-word. I take a very dim view of customers asking for compensation for petty reasons and blacklist those who do – we can only give really good service if we work with people, not against them.

While we’re rewriting the rule book and getting this country back on its feet, let’s do everything we can to put common sense and personal responsibilities back onto the individual and bring some sense of accountability and basic moral decency back into society.

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