Death of the “nine to five” day is good for you

Gone are the notions of “office” and “working day”. Research shows that the “always on” approach is having a positive effect on people’s work and personal lives.

Often driven by career ambition rather then fear, the “always on” state of mind better suits people’s busy lives, research by advertising agency Gyro and Forbes shows. 

A third of people check their work emails every 1-2 hours and over half (52 per cent) would happily step away from a family occasion, such as a dinner, to deal with a business issue.

Despite this, they feel in control to be able to enjoy their free time, as only 15 per cent say that they struggle to separate work from valuable personal or family time. Eighty-four per cent feel better prepared and empowered to make highly-commercial business decisions due to a welcome and constant stream of information.

“Our research challenges the perception that people are unable to juggle busy working lives with personal time,” says Christoph Becker, chief executive and creative officer of Gyro. 

“In fact, UK decision makers are blending work and personal time effectively to make better business decisions, free from the shackles of the ticking clock.”

Free from the constraints of “nine to five”, bosses value the freedom of flexibility that “always on” allows.

The study also shows that:

  • Nearly half (49 per cent) cite personal values as an influence in their decision-making
  • Almost half (49 per cent) feel more productive and better enabled to perform when blending work with personal time
  • Over half (57 per cent) of all business decisions are made at home
  • Sixty-two per cent say that they make better business decisions because they have more time to think clearly
Do you work around the clock? Does this allow you to make better decisions? Leave your comments below.

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