Business Technology

Dell to bolster EMEA operations with 450 new employees

2 min read

14 July 2015

Former deputy editor

US computer technology firm Dell has revealed a plan to supercharge its business with 1,000 new employees globally, with almost half being spread across Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

The move comes following the company’s decision to return into a private business back in October 2013, with founder Michael Dell buying out shareholders for a total of $24.9bn alongside private equity firm Silver Lake Partners.

At the time, he said: “Today, Dell enters an exciting new chapter as a private enterprise. Our 110,000 team members worldwide are 100 per cent focused on our customers and aggressively executing our long-term strategy for their benefit.”

The company claims the private ownership structure allows it to “be more flexible and entrepreneurial” with a “single-minded purpose [to] drive the innovations that will help them [customers] achieve their goals”.

Indeed, the mass recruitment spree will make the largest hiring programme in EMEA since the firm went private. It will see around 450 new members of staff brought on in the region to expand Dell sales, customer support and product line.

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“We have a tremendous amount of opportunities for new hires to apply and cultivate their talents at Dell,” said Aongus Hegarty, president, Dell EMEA.

“We have the most robust and technically advanced product line in our history, as well as an increased wealth of employee benefits such as flexible working and employee resource groups. We need people who understand our goals and what our customers need as we continue to evolve as a private company.”

Dell’s most recent fiscal year resulted in a four per cent revenue growth, with increases in all business divisions in each region globally. The EMEA push is part of a plan to grow its sales force by over 1,000 people in 2015.

Comparatively, the BBC is planning to fire 1,000 members of staff in order to save £50m and keep its costs. With fewer staff on hand, the broadcaster will consolidate divisions and management tiers to bring operations closer together.

According to BBC director-general Tony Hall, what really matters is “delivering outstanding programmes and content for all our audiences.”