HR & Management

Can you describe your growing business in a haiku?

8 min read

18 June 2018

Deputy Editor, Real Business

We asked business leaders to describe their companies in a haiku. Here's what they came up with.

There’s some disagreement as to the length of a haiku. Many insist that it be 17 syllables, with the first of its three short sentences containing five syllables, the middle consisting of seven and then reverting back to five. More modern writers suggest the top and bottom lines can be any number of syllables, as long as it’s shorter than the middle.

Either way, to cram an entire concept into three sentences is no easy feat. But that’s eactly what we asked of bosses in an effort to see how they viewed their growing businesses. Each leader presented us with a brief company description and what they attribute current growth towards. They then tried to sum up it up in haiku form.

Who you gonna call? Not the Ghostbusters

SimplyBookMe’s software offers a 360 degree service – from a customisable front of house website, secure online payments and widgets for apps like Facebook. Its engineers have even developed what they call iBOB, which allows customers to book by speaking to a voice-controlled assistant on the phone.

According to its CEO, Ingvar Gudmundsson, “the growth of the business comes down to constantly trying to innovate the way to help customers.” After many setbacks, Gudmundsson doesn’t rest on his laurels and knows you have to keep moving forward even to stay still in business. 

How would you describe it?

Better call iBOB
Answers your phone 24/7
and fills your schedule!

When you have the means to combat isolation

Claromentis helps businesses communicate, collaborate and engage teams through internal, social technology. Founder Nigel Davies explained that “the company benefited from the rise of virtual and flexible working, and the realisation that people based overseas or working from home easily become isolated.

“We all saw the impact the smartphone boom had on consumer tech. People suddenly stopped being scared of cloud-based apps and, over the years, this has filtered down into the business software market. There’s now huge appetite for technology that’s so user-friendly it can be used by anyone.”

How would you describe it?

Beyond intranets
Is the digital workplace
One place to call home

Creating and valuing relationships

The ELAS Group brings employment law, health and safety, food safety, occupational health, health surveillance, training, absence management and payroll all under one roof. A one-stop shop for all your business needs.

Pam Rogerson, HR director, suggested that what set ELAS apart was its “approach to business. We started small and have never forgotten our roots. People are at the heart of everything we do. We’re not a faceless company. We work to the needs and pain points of each individual business.”

How would you describe it?

Solving your problems
We’re not a faceless brand;
Stay one step ahead.

Cue the A Team theme tune

Clearly PR primarily deals with PR and content marketing services for clients in the recruitment, technology, professional services and financial sectors. 

“Hard work, late nights and a skilled staff to delegate to boosted growth,” said Clarity PR MD Paul MacKenzie-Cummins. “It’s the only way to properly service the clients we work with while still bringing on new business. Many organisations suffer during this stage… but to do a good job, you have to have good people on your team.”

How would you describe it?

If you need PR
And if no-one else can help
(maybe) You should call… Clearly

Can he fix it? Yes he can!

Information Builders helps companies make sense of operational information in order to improve performance. Its chief innovation officer, Dr. Rado Kotorov, said: “We have observed that companies that disseminate information at all levels of the organisation have become more competitive and attracted more customers.

“Even in times of rapid change and disruption, investing in technologies that raise your organisational intelligence by disseminating information to more users is a safe bet.”

How would you describe it?

Data can be gold
If not used for decisions
It’s worth less than coal

Raising the flag for healthcare professionals

Findoc.co.uk enables people to find their nearest healthcare professionals, read patient reviews, and book an appointment directly. It also helps healthcare professionals to improve their search visibility among potential new patients and their patient retention.

The company has been building a strong customer base in London, currently in the private sector, with plans to take expand across the country and to NHS practices, explained Xavier Bernal, founder of Findoc. 

How would you describe it?

Health practitioners
Connect with patients online
Findoc web booking

Understanding customer needs

Frustrated that he couldn’t get a real-time view of his tax bill as a contractor, James Poyser set up InniAccounts. He suggested the company “embraced change as our bread and butter, so always looked at why something is done and how it could be done differently to improve on it. 

“One secret to our success is that we are totally bootstrapped. Bottom line is we’ve created a win win – we have grown a successful business because we have understood our clients want quick and easy real-time accounting, supported by a team of exerts, which allows them to spend more time on what’s important.”

How would you describe it?

Digital numbers
Innovation’s the key
Life made hassle-free

When transparency is the goal

Liberty Marketing was founded in 2008, because of the founder’s bad experiences with agencies whilst in an in-house role. There were hiden fees, a lack of communication and poor work quality.

Transparency is thus at the absolute core of the agency and a large part of why Liberty has grown from a one-man start-up, to an agency of over 30 digital marketing specialists working with some of the country’s biggest brands.

How would you describe it?

Bad agencies rife
Knew that brands deserved better
Liberty to life