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Email etiquette: Top 10 tips when sending work emails

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When writing work emails, the last thing you want to do is appear unprofessional. 

Following a focus group of office workers, experts at Officebroker.com have come pu with the top ten pieces of advice when writing work emails.

“Getting the correct tone of your email is essential,” says a spokesperson for the company. “Far too often people fall out because they misinterpret emails as being rude and abrasive, when the sender is just trying to be succinct. 

“There are a series of unwritten rules when it comes to writing the perfect email, but for some people they need the rules spelling out to them.”

Here are the top ten pieces of advice for correct email etiquette:

1. Kisses
Finishing an email with a kiss (X) is one of the most controversial areas of email etiquette. Some people do it out of habit, others do it to try and curry favour, however, it makes most people feel very uncomfortable.

The best advice is to never use them and if someone sends you one politely forget to send one back.

2. “Hi” vs “Dear”
Choosing the right way to start an email is essential to building a strong online relationship. While acceptable, “dear” sounds old fashioned and will make you come across as a bit of a fuddy-duddy, whereas “hi” creates a friendly and engaging tone.

3. The sign-off
Don’t just let your email signature do all the work, as this will look rude and impersonal so end with “thanks” or “best”. If you are someone who is always short for time, then add a personal sign off into your signature.

4. Short but sweet
If you are a very busy person, then writing short emails may be the most productive use of your time. However, not everyone you email will know this and your usual two-word communiqué could be read as curt or off-hand.

There are ways of getting round this. One is simply taking an extra second to think who you are emailing, the other is to have (p.s.) added into signature which lets people know about your short replies.

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