Opinion

Embracing the entrepreneurial talent in your workforce

4 min read

25 November 2019

Entrepreneurs may be the 'idea generators' for a business, but that doesn't mean their staff aren't equally entrepreneurial in their mindsets.

As any entrepreneur will testify, the biggest asset a business has is its people. And, by building a strong team, together with an entrepreneur’s vision, a business can become successful and lucrative.

I subscribe to the mantra of surrounding yourself with the smartest people possible, drawing on the skills they have for the benefit of the business.

It is something that has served me very well at Pimlico as I am sure it has entrepreneurs in plenty of other companies too.

Time to ‘team’ together?

But often, when business owners put their team together there is perhaps an assumption that there is a different mindset between them, as entrepreneurs, and their people, as employees.

I have often said that entrepreneurs are a breed apart and we have something in our DNA that drives us on to set up, establish and grow our businesses.

I stand by that, but I don’t believe that employees don’t share common traits with entrepreneurs that can be tapped into by a business to deliver success and rewards for all.

This view appears to be backed up by some research by The Myers-Briggs Company carried out as part of the recent Global Entrepreneurship Week, which says that 40% of workers consider themselves to be entrepreneurs.

Of those questioned, about a third said they would consider starting their own business, which should be encouraged as there should never be a shortage of entrepreneurs.

Embracing entrepreneurialism (in your workforce)

But, perhaps, what it appears to suggest more is that enterprising businesses can thrive if they embrace the entrepreneurial talents that exist within their workforce.

So, based on THE premise that entrepreneurialism is inherent in parts of the workforce as well as in those who lead businesses, this could be a significant advantage in a time of economic uncertainty.

As we know, entrepreneurs drive economic growth, so perhaps this could be a solution to overcoming productivity challenges.

If employees are encouraged to seize their entrepreneurial talents and place them front and centre with their other valuable skills, businesses could be on to a real winner.

Now, I’m a plumber, not a psychologist, and I will leave the personality studies to the HR experts out there, but I am sure there is something in this.

Finding those entrepreneurial thinkers…

There will be people who prefer the security of employment over the relative uncertainty that can come with entrepreneurialism.

But within them are those character traits, which are often attributed to entrepreneurs, such as the curiosity and willingness to try new things and take risks.

In a lot of businesses, there will be employees where these talents come very naturally, and they are our crown jewels.

Helping you achieve success

We are lucky enough to have some at Pimlico and they play an important role in driving our business forward.

I am convinced that there will be many more out there who don’t believe they should call upon these skills because they are employees and not entrepreneurs, which is a shame.

If workers can be encouraged to unlock these attributes within their own DNA and apply entrepreneurial thinking to their jobs, then they can become the cherry on top of the workforce cake.