HR & Management

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Five ways to boost staff retention

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New and innovative ways to motivate and reward staff are increasingly being pursued in the challenge to ensure staff stay happy and continue to contribute long term to the success of a business.

Kent-based Rainbow Global Network Services LLP is a supplier of some of the world’s premier telecoms, data and technology brands. The company’s aggressive growth strategy has seen staff numbers swell from 5 to 40 since the business started in 2002. Staff retention is particularly high. 

Managing director Dave Corgat has compiled five of the best ways that, in his opinion, make all the difference when it comes to retaining great people.

1. Have fun

There is no reason to run a business with an iron rule. A lighter touch and a more social environment mean people will feel comfortable being themselves. And when people are allowed to be themselves, not having to stand on ceremony, you get a far more relaxed atmosphere. Staff enjoy coming to work, so they work harder, experience a greater degree of personal satisfaction and are therefore inclined to stay long term.

2. Ditch targets

Taking the pressure away that’s associated with targets will eliminate the stress factor, something that is responsible for countless sick days every year. You may wonder how a sales orientated business can survive without targets, but the fact is targets can do more harm than good. With month end looming and targets out of sight, it is easy to make poor decisions or dish out discounts that could be very damaging to a business.

3. Focus on life skills

Training opportunities generally account for good staff motivation and high retention. But instead of focusing solely on sales, technical or academic training, think about bringing in some life skills education. Consider offering communication and presentation workshops, public speaking tutoring, confidence coaching, train the trainer and team building sessions. Anything that helps to strengthen the feeling of belonging and responsibility will lead to people naturally wanting to stay.

4. Keep your people in the loop

Never assume everyone knows or understands the direction you want to take your business in. Keep all staff informed and involved as much as possible: keep an open book. Invest in your team, not just with money and facilities but by giving them responsibility and trusting in their decisions and their vision, and share the journey with them.

5. Show appreciation

Reward your team as a whole. Don’t single out superstars: a business is a single entity, measured and tested by the weakest, not the strongest. Think of innovative ways to show your appreciation and at the same time, encourage the team to pull together and help each other.

A day or night out or even a short break will be greatly appreciated, and will further boost the social atmosphere in your business, encouraging that feeling of belonging that is so important when it comes to retaining staff.

When you can keep your staff for the long haul, there are numerous benefits to enjoy. Recruitment and induction costs are minimised; customer relationships are strengthened thanks to ongoing associations with their contacts and your people become advocates for your business and begin to share your vision and goals.

Focusing on staff retention is key to the success of any business. Go about it in an innovative way, and you will reap great rewards.

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