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Government transparency key in post-Brexit world

4 min read

03 April 2017

Article 50 has been triggered, and Charlie Mullins is calling for government transparency to make the process more palatable for remainers and the business community.

Last Wednesday was the day I think a large proportion of the country hoped would never come. But come it has, and now the process to kick off our split from the EU has begun. We need to knuckle down, pick up the pieces, mend the broken relationships, and dispense with the anger of the past twelve months.

We need to remain amicable in the divorce proceedings, as the EU has promised to be to us, and to build a new Britain, one that remains a part of Europe, even when our membership expires.

It’s true that we’re stepping into a black hole of uncertainty and no one can categorically say what will be at the end of the next two years. Nevertheless remainers, like myself, need to get with the programme and continue to build our businesses and do what we do best.

In my case, I think that will include re-doubling my efforts on demanding that apprenticeships and T-Levels are championed and recognised as the way of the future.

In a post-Brexit environment, where the supply of skilled labour is under threat, we now, more than ever before, must understand that we have to train our own people if we are going to stay ahead of the competition and hold our own in both Europe and the rest of the world.

It is, however, also true that those who wanted to leave, and those who decided to align their political futures closely to the Brexit project, must understand that they need to take the entire country with them and protect everyone’s needs if they are to be successful. To neglect to do this could well see our society descend into the type of social upheaval last seen on our streets during the Poll Tax riots of the 1990s.

I make this warning because of the discontent with, not only the result of the referendum, but the tactics and outright lies that were used. This, coupled with the government’s secrecy and apparent air of righteousness of its cause, is still, nine months later, bubbling away just below the surface.

From this moment onwards, there needs to be far more government transparency in terms of what it is negotiating for. For example what will happen to our EU friends who are working and contributing to our economy and culture? How long is it going to take? We also need an admission from our negotiators that there cannot be a Brexit without some degree of pain.

Our political leaders need to understand that repeating “It’s gonna be the best Brexit for Britain, so good, just sooo good”, in the style of Donald Trump, just will not hold water for very much longer.

There’s no doubt that whatever future we face, it will be a challenge, and we can’t succeed without our government transparency and an honest approach to Brexit. If we’re presented with this, which I hope we are, I’m confident that our resilient little country will get through the next ten years in the strong position that we were in at the beginning.