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Guerrilla marketing: How to market in a recession

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As a growing business, you don’t have big budgets and you need to minimise risk versus investment. You need to be unconventional. You need to be a guerrilla.

Guerrillas are bold and creative, offering more than the competition, regardless of market conditions. The beauty of a guerrilla marketeer is his flexibility, allowing him to withstand the bears and bulls breathing down his neck. 

Guerrilla marketing is easy to achieve

When writing an initial marketing strategy, keep it short and easy to follow.  The key is that content is consistent and delivered with commitment. Look at your customers as long-term partners – it is six times more costly to secure a new prospect compared with converting an existing customer. And make sure you are offering what the client wants rather than what you think they want or should want. 

Guerrilla marketing is an investment 

Your marketing budget should be viewed as an investment, rather than a begrudged spend BUT you must be patient and confident; ready to sell the steak and the sizzle combined. Rely on technology and an assortment of tools – and use marketing to achieve customer consent prior to securing a sale. 

Guerrilla marketing is about the sale itself 

Be mindful that profits come second in line to the sale itself. Make your business customer-convenient and measure the effectiveness of your campaigns through realistic methods: how your team answers the telephone can be as important as the quality of ingredients in your cupcakes and the ease of navigation of your website.

Guerrilla marketing isn’t rocket science 

What guerrilla marketing isn’t is rocket science.  When a guerrilla marketing strategy is in place and working, your marketing is working inwards – for and towards the customer rather than outside, at the mercy of the global economy. The last thing any guerrilla would want to be is a lamb to the proverbial slaughter…

Jay Conrad Levinson’s Guerrilla Marketing books have sold 21m copies worldwide and are included in MBA book-reading lists the world over.

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