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Start tackling the reasons why employees hate their job

Over a third of employees hate their job. This is resulting in 84.4 per cent of the nation’s workers looking for new work in a bid to escape the factors that make their job so unbearable.
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The news that employees hate their job comes as a low blow for many organisations, especially those struggling to retain staff and create a positive working environment. Below, I explore some of our research findings in more detail and advise on what you could consider changing in your organisations to help your employees fall in love with their job again.

1) Create a positive working environment

One of the top reasons employees hate their job is poor company culture. It goes without saying that any working environment that is overly strict, quiet and fails to stimulate employees is going to drive them away. Boredom was another reason. Consider how you can make your workplace a bit more exciting – whether that’s introducing staff communal lunches, a trip to the pub at the end of the week or charity events – it can be done without breaking the bank.

2) Monitor stress levels and workloads

Stress, high workloads and a poor work-life balance will make a worker want to explore new opportunities, which is why it was not surprising to see these factors crop up in our research. That said, these shouldn’t be a given! Stress is one of the biggest issues in many workplaces across the UK, made worse by the fact that many businesses fail to address it properly. Keeping a close eye on your employee’s wellbeing, stepping in before it gets too much and splitting out workloads evenly and fairly are all positive actions that can be made.

3) Reward hard work where you can

It’s an unfortunate truth that many workers feel undervalued and while it can be difficult to constantly reward employees when they’ve done something well, it is important to foster an environment where people do get a pat on the back if they’ve worked particularly hard! Being praised for good work is a great ego boost for the best of us, so consider how you can give something back to your employees when they’ve done something impressive. Some businesses even go as far to offer incentive programmes and monthly awards, which can go a long way to keeping staff motivated.

4) Facilitate exciting career paths

Another top factor cited in our research was the lack of development opportunities. While it can be difficult to constantly offer promotions, especially if you’re a small business, it is important to think about ways in which your employees can develop, especially if it’s going to boost your business in the long run. Whether that’s helping them to up-skill in a certain area, or picking up tasks that traditionally fall out of their remit, consider ways in which you can facilitate exciting career paths in your company. It’s best to keep these conversations going regularly, to ensure that your workers are aware that there are plenty of opportunities for them, if they stay put!

Overall, it’s clear there are a range of factors which can make employees hate their job, but there are steps that you can take to help workers feel more comfortable, confident, appreciated, rewarded and most of all, excited to be a part of your business. Things can’t always change overnight, but consider the small changes you can make that will help your employees fall in love with their job again.

Lee Biggins is founder and managing director of CV-Library

Image: Shutterstock

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About Author

Lee Biggins

Lee Biggins founded CV-Library in 2000 with a loan of £9,000 as a response to his identification of a need for an easy-to-use job board. The business now has a database of over 10.6m CVs.  

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