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Job location more important to UK workers than wages

3 min read

15 April 2015

Former deputy editor

Location is the most important factor keeping British workers in their current job roles, coming in ahead of wages and and job security, according to ClickSoftware.

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The mobile workforce management company conducted a survey following the launch of a competition to determine the most extreme views field workers experience, which included  wild seas, a tornado and the inside of a mine.

The findings revealed the location is the most important factor keeping 57 per cent of UK workers in their jobs, while 52 per cent cited the wage and 33 per cent favoured the job security.

Indeed a fifth of people claim productivity at work is affected negatively by the location of their job, spiking to 26 per cent of Londoners. Meanwhile, staff in the south-east of the country are the ones who treasure their location the most.

Results showed a “horrible location” is most likely to impact young professionals, as 25 to 34 year olds said productivity is likely to be influenced as a result. Two-thirds of respondents have even considered leaving or have left their job for a change of scenery.

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Home was named the most popular place to work and was considered to be very comfortable by 60 per cent of workers. Meanwhile, 72 per cent would dislike working underground and in contrast 51 per cent would feel uncomfortable working in a role that involved heights.

To discover interesting views, 46 per cent said working on the road would do the job, while 45 per cent said working high in the open and 44 per cent said working out at sea. 

“We wanted to highlight and champion the people who work in some of the most extreme and sometimes dangerous places across the world. What may seem like an extreme location to most, such as hanging off telephone poles or being surrounded by darkness down a mine, is simply their everyday office,” said Moshe BenBassat, founder and CEO of ClickSoftware. 

“The caliber of photos we received show the lengths that these workers go to every day to safeguard everyday convenience for the rest of us by ensuring the gas flows and the lights are on.”

Gary Mullen from Ricoh won for his photo of colleagues working on an oil rig at sea and received £1,000 for a charity of his choice.

Image: Shutterstock