Leadership & Productivity

Jobseekers have the upper hand as employers learn to sell themselves

3 min read

26 December 2017

Former special projects journalist

For businesses operating in industries with a skills gap, evidence shows it is time to pull out the big guns to win talent over jobseekers during an interview.

Around 45 per cent of people looking for a job have turned down a role because the company failed to impress them during the interview process.

This is according to research by NGA Human Resources, which highlighted the need for scale-up owners to put their best foot forward during the recruitment process to secure top talent.

Other reasons cited by job seekers who have turned down positions include having received a better offer elsewhere (56 per cent), lower than anticipated salary offer (49 per cent) and finding out the role was not as advertised (44 per cent).

In addition, jobseekers these days are looking for more than just a good salary. Around 33 per cent of people have declined an offer because the business did not have flexible working options, 29 per cent due to the lack of decent benefits and 27 per cent because they just didn’t feel they would be a good fit.

“In today’s job market the power lies firmly in the hands of the job seeker – they now have the pick of the bunch with opportunities,” said Anna Dickson, talent management specialist at NGA Human Resources.

“Firms must react by investing in the recruitment and onboarding processes. This means having the right technology and tools to implement an efficient, honest and professional approach to recruitment and a tailored, thorough and structured onboarding programme. Getting employees integrated and up to speed quickly, boosts productivity and job satisfaction, both of which increase the chances that they’ll stay at the company for the longer term.”

A strong onboarding process is key for scale-ups focusing on staff retention, as today only 31 per cent of employees stay past the first year at each job throughout their careers. Reasons for moving on within the first year of a role included unhappiness within the role (39 per cent), dissatisfaction with the company culture (27 per cent), poor onboarding (18 per cent) and not getting on with colleagues (17 per cent).

This article is part of a wider campaign called the Scale-up Hub, a section of Real Business that provides essential advice and inspiration on taking your business to the next level. It’s produced in association with webexpenses and webonboarding, a fast-growing global organisation that provides cloud-based software services that automate expenses management and streamline the employee onboarding process.