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Learning from the automotive greats about reputation

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(3) Jaguar Land Rover (JLR)

According to UK managing director Jeremy Hicks, for JLR it’s all about knowing what the public wants and maintaining a keen interest in relationships with customers, as well as valuing their thoughts.

JLR intermingles those aspects and one particular example is how it changed the way its cars were being built. It’s difficult being an automotive firm in an era where everyone is conscious about the environment. In this sense, JLR is giving its rivals a lesson in creativity.

The brand has started building new cars on old chassis found at the factory, and its announcement of souring E-Types across the globe and rebuilding them in Britain can only be described as innovative. This penchant for breaking the mould extends even further. The company has its own 007 Q-style experience! It recently opened a 20m “special ops” headquarters which is geared towards creating bespoke, and undoubtedly expensive, cars for the wealthy.

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Image: Shutterstock

(4) Mercedes-Benz

There’s one word that can describe what led to Mercedes-Benz’s success: variety. Often a luxurious line is very exclusive, and as such, has less products and choices, focusing on a very small and fairly non-variable product range.

But most of all, it’s about offering a product that’s reliable. In fact,A decade agoMercedes used to be the car of choice for taxisAll over the worldgiven how comfortable the seats were and how safe the car was known to be.

So in much the same way that BMW endeavours to keep its key messages the same, Mercedes strives to offer cars that are known for beingcomfortable and reliable. Maybe less in the recent years, with many suggesting the car is packed with technology that is unneeded but the perception remains.

Image: Shutterstock

(5) Nissan

Quality and efficiency are two factors no company can do without. But when you’re in the business of making products then you’re only as great as your suppliers and the factories being used.

Take, for example, the UK arm of the Nissan operation based in Sunderland. In March 2012, Nissan had a growth spurt thanks to Sunderland’s success in attracting investment from its parent company. This rested on the plant’s reputation as a particularly efficient car factory, as well as its close relationships with local suppliers and its ability to support new ones.

Nissan’s then chief executive Carlos Ghosn, was well aware that “the Sunderland plant set an important benchmark for quality and efficiency in Europe and around the world”. And still to this day, Sunderland is recognised as having been a vital contributor to bolstering the manufacturing industry and thus helping to rebalance the UK economy.

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