HR & Management

Mike Norfield

3 min read

09 January 2012

Mike Norfield, CEO of Team Telecom Group, on British manufacturing, F1 and apprenticeship programmes.

Name: Mike Norfield 

Age: 48 

Company: Team Telecom Group (TTG). We’re a global telecommunications specialist, providing telecoms solutions to organisations around the globe. Through our five businesses (Team Simoco, ComGroup, AirRadio, Indigo Telecom Group and C&C Technology), we manufacture and deliver communication technologies and services to businesses across Europe, the Middle East, the Far East, Australia, Africa and the Americas.

Turnover: £50m 

First job: An apprentice radio engineer in 1979 with Redifon (Rediffusion Radio Systems) where I obtained my professional qualifications in radio engineering and electronics. 

Dream job: F1 driver 

Car: I currently drive an Audi TT but my dream car is a McLaren. 

Economy, business or first class: Business           

Most extravagant purchase: A month-long trip exploring Australia with my family over Christmas. A fantastic experience for us all, but not for my bank manager!

Most played song on iPod: “Comfortably Numb” by Pink Floyd. 

Best business book: Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It advocates financial independence through investing, real estate, owning businesses, and the use of finance protection tactics.

Worst business moment: Losing a deal to a competitor who I felt didn’t deserve it at the time.

Proudest business moment: It would have to be leading the £32.8m management buy out of TTG from former parent company Spice in 2010.

Business mentor: Steve Jobs is someone who I admire and is a great source for inspiration due to his leadership and incredible success. In terms of personal mentors that I’ve been lucky enough to work with, it would have to be Peter Burridge, the chairman of TTG.

Next big thing: The next big thing for me is to continue to build TTG’s global success, increase profits and take TTG to £100m turnover. I am also very committed to our apprenticeship programme, as I vehemently believe the UK has to do more to invest in the next generation of engineers if our manufacturing sector is to help achieve economic growth. On a larger scale, I hope that the government will take a look at the issues involved in R&D and education. If we fail to invest, Britain will lack both the technology and the skills to have any impact on the global stage. It needs us all – government, banks and business – to pull together to make this happen.