Business Technology

Published

Nine reasons why you shouldn’t create a business blog

6 Mins

1. “My business doesn’t get any enquiries from my website”

One of the key advantages of a business blog is that it adds regular fresh keyword-optimised content to your web domain. This means that search engines like Google will have plenty to index. And as Google updates get more interested in the relevance of longer sentences – it’s here where your blog could win. For companies who would never get any enquiries through their website then a blog may not be for you. 

2. “I don’t see the value in it”

Blogging not only delivers value, it delivers value you can really measure (views, subscribers, shares, enquiries are all great blog metrics to monitor and set goals around). Blogs are also extremely cost effective. Oh, and forget about the fact that optimising posts with your keywords and pushing out the content to the right audiences will improve your Google rankings too.

3. “My business is full of sought-after gurus”

Blogs help organisations to inspire customer confidence in their brand. This is largely because they demonstrate expert knowledge and experience. If you already have a great reputation as an expert in your area then a blog will only serve to perpetuate your iconic status and so if you don’t want to boost your status then a blog is something to avoid at all costs. But of course if you don’t mind the attention, or are just a mere mortal, this is your chance to shine.

4. “I am telepathic and already know exactly what my customers are thinking”

Perhaps your target audience never changes and is completely unaffected by new trends. Perhaps you don’t want to diversify your customer base at all. Or maybe you have already absorbed all there is to know about your customers and potential customers, including how they think and what makes them tick. You’re telepathic! In which case you have no need to gather their views and feedback. It’s best then to ignore all the comments and shares you could have got on your blog, combined with the insight analytics can give to direct your marketing focus.

5. “Here today, gone tomorrow: social media won’t last”

If you think that social media is just a fad, with no provable results, it’s probably not worth wasting your time on a blog. Why bother to create valuable content in an easy-to-read format, that is delivered directly to those most interested in what you’ve got to say? Leave this tactic to your competitors instead.

6. “My company already has a stellar brand”

If you are already one of the top ten most valuable brands in the world, then of course you might not need to improve brand image through business blogging (although, funnily enough, all of the top brands do it).

7. “I simply don’t have the time”

OK, OK – at least this excuse is a little more credible. But honestly, if you don’t think it is worth spending an hour or two of your time, each week (presuming you want fresh posts once a week) then don’t worry about creating a blog. But it will cost you nothing, and will get your business found by the right people. 

8. “I just have nothing to say”

I understand. There’s no news from you, your company or your industry or maybe your company is a secret organisation. You deal in drugs, arms and other contraband substances. Maybe you’re involved in something criminal or completely suspect. These guys obviously don’t tend to blog. Hoping that you’re not an illegal organisation, I’m guessing you’re either going for the secret approach, or are in an industry I’ve never heard of before…

9. “But blogs run on computers and I’m no techie”

Blogs are best to write offline in a word processing programme. When ready, simply copy and paste into your blog content management system (free ones are really easy to setup). Most modern website content management systems have been designed to add these easily enough. And you can always find a techie to help.

So, if you are not bothered about growing your business with this cost-effective marketing method, then please feel free to use any of these excuses as often as you like.

James Cox is founder and Managing director of Tracepoint

Image Source

Share this story

5 quickfire ways to improve your content marketing strategy for 2014!
Peter Atterby: Pushing the boundaries in plastics technology
Send this to a friend