HR & Management

Do one in ten really plan to hit on boss at office Christmas parties?

3 min read

29 November 2017

Former deputy editor

The festive season is upon us, and it appears staff will happily risk it all at work gatherings, spending big money – and putting hearts on the line – for the occasion.

As we enter December and are met with this year’s seasonal adverts, office Christmas parties will now be taking place up and down the country.

Printerland.co.uk conducted a survey of 2,000 office workers across the UK, which revealed that the average employees spend around £150.28 each on their Office Christmas parties.

The bulk of that money is in a bid to dress to impress, with £53 spent on new clothes and shoes. Elsewhere, seemingly discontent with the complimentary feast and booze office Christmas parties come with, £34 is spent on more food and drinks.

However, women are more likely to spend more, the findings found as the figure crept up to an average spend of £156. Printerland revealed that £26 can be spent on shoes, £17 can be spent on hair and a further £17 on jewellery. For men, it’s said they are more likely to spend £10 more on food and drinks than female counterparts.

“It’s great to see that so many workers are set to enjoy the Christmas party, but they should be mindful that their behaviour will be on full display for their colleagues – and managers – to see,” said Catherine Bannan, HR manager at Printerland.co.uk.

Respondents said that at least two drinks are needed to warm up for office Christmas parties, while six on average are consumed over the course of the bash. Meanwhile, four drinks would get them on the dance floor and eight drinks are considered too many, but a third of workers admit guzzling beyond that.

Too much drink is a concern for 40 per cent though, as they admit being concerned they’ll make fools of themselves for things like flirting with peers while being completely inebriated.

Flirting was not a fear for others though, as quarter admitted to “Christmas canoodling”, while ten per cent admitting sleeping together. Elsewhere, a seemingly fearless ten per cent flirt with bosses during office Christmas parties, with six per cent using the mistletoe as an opener, while two per cent have got bosses into bed.

However, a third of staff admitted to regretting their fleeting romances and some even found partners for the night were married.

Bannan added: “Remember that you’ll still have to work with your colleagues after the party and any embarrassing errors you make are likely to be recalled – and laughed about – for years to come.”

While some are keen to spend their cash in preparation and romance their peers, 15 per cent would rather avoid office Christmas parties entirely.

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