Opinion

Our over-protected, nannied state shaped generation with unrealistic concept of entrepreneurship

5 min read

24 August 2016

Entrepreneurship has been the catchword of the last ten years and politicians have heralded it as the solution to our various economic problems – from decreasing the number of jobless Brits to the incredible success of businesses in a period of uncertainty.

But Labour has mixed views on the subject, going from encouraging the average man in the street to start a business, to slamming the rich and successful at every turn. The latter opinion has recently tipped the mixed view scale, with unions and extremists of the Labour Party seeing every business owner as rich and idle in a way that reflects the French Revolution.

And with the media promoting quick get-rich schemes, many of the young assume it is easy to achieve instant success. Raised in the technology age of instant satisfaction, they are brought up with an expectation of life that is totally unrealistic. And yes, I am showing my age, but it is not something that the older generation were ever given –a sense of entitlement that leads to anger and resentment.

Schools and universities have been quick to latch on to the trend of entrepreneurship. On visits to both institutions to hear of ideas and give advise, I am always impressed by the odd outstanding student and depressed by the volume of those who have absolutely no concept of what it is like to run a business. They have no concept of the necessity of having a service/product that is sellable, leave alone the necessity to actually make a profit. Their egos combined with this sense of entitlement leads them to believe their idea is justification enough to have a business and be guaranteed funding.

Read more from Jan Cavelle:

The unions and the far left feed the same expectation into the British workforce. I have seen it time again where small companies are held to ransom by employees who demand a pay rise and then cause chaos in at work because they just don’t get it. In my book, that is blackmail. However, the unions encourage workers to believe they have the right to cause disruption and the business will have the money to pay for whatever results they inflict. I have heard of union leaders considering shutting a company down a victory, despite the resultant job losses for members, because it “showed” the business owner.

Few unsuspecting young starting a business have heard about the reality of being an entrepreneur. They hear little of the non-existent work-life balance, continual stress levels, sleepless nights and personal risk factors. They know little of the weekly payroll and the time and stress factor of dealing with staff. They know little or nothing of the ever increasing burden or red tape, new legislation, high business rates and huge insurance premiums. I have found that only a minuscule percentage of employees are even aware of employers NI.

They do not hear of the high number of SMEs that go to the wall every year. This is largely due to politicians not being so quick to publish exact numbers of losses.

This over-protected, nannied state we live in has created generations with no ability to see the link between cause and effect.

I wonder how long it is going to take for this particular new age bubble of expectation to burst. For how long will employees with unreasonable expectations be amazed that they are out of work? How many people will go through the experience of starting up a business for it to fail before the penny drops that it is not a golden road.

In another article, Jan Cavelle explains that it’s become apparent how easy it is to kill potential.

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