Any other business

Published

Out of the credit crunch, great advertising campaigns

2 Mins

I’m locked in a debate with my friends over which is better: the Cadbury eyebrow advert or comparethemarket.com’s campaign. For me, the meerkat character in comparethemarket.com’s ads wins hands down. It’s so memorable and the company has followed the theme on all its websites.

If social networking websites are the barometer of success these days, it’s hard to tell which advert is better rated. Alexander the meerkat has over 154,000 "friends" on Facebook but the Cadbury advert is one of the most viewed of its kind on YouTube. In fact, Syncsta’s spoof of the eyebrow twitching on YouTube is even better than the advert itself.

Watching all these ads gets me thinking: does cutting advertising spend make sense in the current climate? People are talking about how advertising revenues are down as businesses of all sizes cut their marketing budgets. This is a natural reaction and money does have to be saved from somewhere – but I don’t think slashing your ad spend is the best method to survive a downturn. If consumer confidence dips, surely companies need to go that extra mile with their advertising or marketing efforts?

We’ll start to see the negative effects on the companies who have simply bought their way into success with big marketing budgets, as they struggle to reach a high enough critical sales mass to recoup the initial spend. However, there are golden opportunities for businesses who think outside the box  One of the best systems I have seen is offered by Imitza Systems – based in my native north-east of England but operating nationwide. Its software helps businesses upsell to existing clients, analyse responses to email marketing promotions and make sure that the simple things are well executed.

The lesson is not to cut your marketing budget in this climate – but to spend it more wisely.

Related articles:Stop fretting, start fighting

Picture source

Share this story

Michael Jackson: marketing genius
Entrepreneur’s trademark headache
Send this to a friend