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Over half of Brits are unhappy in their current jobs

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In its annual ‘Jobs Exodus‘ survey tracking employee sentiment, Investors in People (IIP) found that as the economy gains pace, British businesses may need to invest more in their employees or face a potential exodus of talented staff.

It turns out that 60 per cent of people are not happy in their current roles.

Read more about how to retain your staff:

Lack of job satisfaction was cited as the primary reason for the desire to change roles, with 48 per cent believing they would be more satisfied elsewhere. Interestingly, job satisfaction is deemed more important than pay (44 per cent), while feeling valued at work by leadership teams is also rated as one of the highest factors (30 per cent).

The number of workers who think the jobs market has improved in the past year, with more opportunities for new employment, now stands at 32 per cent, up from 28 per cent in 2014, and are looking to take advantage of it. 

Men are more likely to move jobs in the next 12 months, with 59 per cent considering a job change, compared to 56 per cent of women. 

The professional services industry is the most at risk sector, with 68 per cent of staff considering moving, a notable rise from 55 per cent last year. 

Businesses in London, Brighton and Bristol face the highest risk of staff departures, with 66 per cent, 64 per cent and 63 per cent considering moving respectively.

Paul Devoy, head of IIP, said: “The research should be a stark wake up call to many businesses. These companies must work hard to retain the staff they have and also put the effort into attracting top quality talent from elsewhere. 

“This exodus is driven by workers that value the wide range of professional and personal benefits that a good employer can bring: career progression, job satisfaction and development of expertise. Employers must carefully consider what they offer their staff; an active jobs market can be a blessing to those who raise the standard of how they treat, train and develop their people.” 

Lacking proper internal management can put people off applying for jobs, as having a reputation as a good employer is one of the top three considerations for prospective employees (cited by 39 per cent of respondents). This is alongside competitive pay (64 per cent) and enjoying your work (62 per cent).

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