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School proms increasingly expensive for parents – and more lucrative for retailers

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School is almost out for summer and for most students – and some lucky adults that chose to educate for a living – that means a six-week summer holiday.

But for those in year 11 who are ready to leave secondary school for the pleasure of working for the next 50 years – or further education – there’s one obstacle they will need to overcome before departing; prom.

Indeed, 72 per cent of British teenagers are set to attend a prom in the coming weeks, according to VoucherCodes.co.uk. As such, retailers in the fashion and beauty sectors are set to experience a sales boost as related searches have grown by 140 per cent over the past month.

Read more on how events impact business results:

“It’s fascinating to see how much more is being spent by British consumers on prom now compared to five years ago and brilliant that it’s giving a boost to UK retailers,” said Claire Davenport, managing director of VoucherCodes.co.uk.

“Interestingly, our data reveals five per cent more prom-related searches were made from a mobile device than from a desktop in June as value-driven shoppers were searching for an offer whilst they were on the high street.

“Retailers should make sure they are utilising the added marketing opportunities presented by mobile-friendly affiliate partners’ to capitalise on this increase in demand from their consumers.”

Demonstrating the rising impact of the UK prom on the social calendar – and retailers’ finances – the average amount spent on a prom has grown from £178 in 2010 to £236 in 2015.

According to Vouchercodes.co.uk, retailers have been preparing for the sales to come in and have looked to encourage business. May and June this year saw 37 per cent more deals for fashion and accessories live and 27 per cent more health and beauty codes than in March and April.

Image: Shutterstock

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