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Six lessons from the Royal Family about marketing your business online

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In April, Her Royal Highness, The Queen, started celebrations to mark her 90th birthday, with multiple events being held across the UK and the Commonwealth over the coming months.

The outpouring of support for HRH and her family over the last few years, especially surrounding events such as 2011’s royal wedding and the births of Prince George and Princess Charlotte, suggests that Brand Royal, despite being arguably one of the oldest in existence, continues to be relevant and well-loved today.

Research from YouGov backs up the assertion that the monarchy remains popular across all parts of British society, finding that 68 per cent believe the institution to be good for the country and that 71 per cent want the British monarchy to remain.

So what can businesses wanting to build a strong and well-respected online brand learn from the Royal Family?

Here are my top six lessons your brand should learn from the Royal Family’s marketing machine:

(1) Have a consistent voice on social media

The Queen sent her first tweet on 24 October 2014, and since then it appears the Twitter account @RoyalFamily has been written by her office, updating followers with news about HRH and her family. However, it was the Duke of York who was the first Royal to launch his own personal Twitter account @TheDukeOfYork, with tweets signed “AY” written by the Duke himself.

No one really expects the Queen to be drafting and sending her own tweets, but the @RoyalFamily thrives with a steady, consistent stream of posts that provide an authentic, personal touch – from sharing pictures of the pile of birthday cards that arrived for HRH to family videos of Prince Charles as a child. A brand that stays true to what it represents rather than just sharing what it thinks others want is key.

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(2) Humanise your brand

There are a number of things brands can do to be more human and therefore attractive to consumers, including showing a sense of humour, using everyday language and engaging in conversation.

Prince Harry and the Queen highlighted this perfectly in their first Instagram video as they responded to a teasing message from the Obamas’ about Harry’s Invictus games in Orlando.

And, although it would be extremely difficult for the Royals to reply to every comment or question, retweeting shows they’re aware and appreciative of the message. It’s also a quick and easy way to boost engagement and gain followers. For example, @BritishMonarchy retweeted astronaut Tim Peak’s birthday wish.

Having a Twitter handle makes individuals feel that they’re only one click away from their idols and favourite brands – which managed well can build a real, emotive connection with followers. The Royal Family of course has to maintain a certain level of decorum and we wouldn’t expect to see the Queen posting #foodie pictures on Instagram, or using Twitter to poke fun at other members of her family – though they can leave the parody accounts to do that for them:

Continue reading on the next page for more on giving your business that regal touch.

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