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Some of the most creative “must-see” billboards across the globe

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Billboards with a function

In a recent on-street campaign, IBM took invasive adverting to a whole new level by making their billboards become part of the local infrastructure. 

The goal was to create adverts that would serve a purpose instead of conveying a message.

Ogilvy and Mather France took the average billboard and bent it into different shapes in order to recreate shelters, seats and even ramps.

Coca Cola wrapping paper

In December 2014, Coke paired with Belgian creative agency Duval Guillaume Modem to help ease the stress of the holiday by providing free gift wrap from a specially-designed Coca-Cola billboard.

Installed across shopping centres in Belgium’s largest cities, the advert allowed people to tear off a square of wrapping paper to take with home with them.

In a blog, Modem explained: “As the brand that stands for ‘Open Happiness’, Coca-Cola believes there’s no better time to open happiness than with Christmas. But to open happiness… you need to wrap it first. That’s why we created a billboard made entirely of wrapping paper.”

Orphea bug spray

Bug spray is possibly one of the least sexiest things to advertise, which is often a stumbling block for companies in the market. When Orphea created their own ‘4d Protection’ bug spray, they decided to bet on consumer curiosity. Instead of merely telling them what the spray could do, they decided to show them.

The company placed a billboard in a busy area of Milan, with successful results. Using an invisible sticky substance, presumably the same stuff that goes into their spray, they created a bug-collage for passers-by to witness. 

The results, which may be gross to some, can be seen in the below Youtube video.

Kill Bill 2

Advertising company Saachi & Saachi are known for taking things to the extreme. Take, for example, their burning billboard Ponsonby Central meant to replicate the traditional kiln method restaurant Sealord uses to prepare the salmon. But this was exactly what film Kill Bill 2 needed. Merely putting Uma Thurman on a billboard wouldn’t do the trick. 

To highlight the film’s blood spilling nature, Saachi & Saachi splattering the advert with blood. This also included the nearby wall, the path beside it, and three white cars which they bought for added effect. 

Sealord pyro stunt

For those piqued by the flaming billboard:

British Airways: pointing out planes

British Airways unveiled digital billboards in London which will “interact with aircrafts flying overhead”, from the perspective of children.

Developed by Ogilvy 12th Floor, the billboard uses custom-built surveillance technology to tracks airplanes and interrupts the digital display just as it passes over the site, revealing the image of a child pointing at the plane overhead accompanied by its flight number and where it departed from.

Dominos interaction with delivery men

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This inspired a spoof made by Dominos. To rival British Airways’ #lookup campaign, the pizza company invites consumers to #Lookdown at a pizza delivery man as he walks past.

Nick Dutch, head of digital at Domino’s Pizza, said: “The lookdown campaign was a fantastic chance for Domino’s Pizza to recapture the fun and passion that’s at the core of everything we do. I’m delighted with the results and think people will really respond to the light hearted humour at the heart of this creative idea”.

Producing drinkable water

Believe it or not, UTEC developed the first billboard that produces potable water from the air. it was developed in order to solve the drinking situation in Peru.

In Lima, many suffer because of a lack of drinkable water. In response, UTEC partnered with an advertising firm to create a billboard that can actually produce drinking water from the water vapour in the air. The billboard produced 9,450 liters in just its first three months. 

Renovation ads

Germany is the owner of hundreds of DIY shops, many of which have had to close down in recent years. 

The nation’s largest chain, OBI, together with Jung Von Matt, asked the question: “Why do people advertise products that are supposed to make our homes look nicer using adverts that make everything look uglier?”

Saving the world?

Japanese natural cosmetics brand Shokubutsu Hana stands for healthy beauty and a green future. Tt created a billboard made of vetiver grass spelling “clean river soon” and floated it on the Pasig River in the Phillipines. 

Vetiver is a grass that can filter toxins, and the Pasig River is so polluted that it was declared biologically dead in the 1990s. The company partnered up with a rehabilitation commission and vetiver growers to pull off the project.

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