News

Summer Budget 2015: As it happened on Twitter

8 min read

08 July 2015

What we've learned from previous Budget's is that Twitter is undoubtedly the place to go when you want information to be condensed, and are looking for the not-so-neutral version of public reaction. We rounded up the days announcements and comments – social media style.

Some four months ago, Osborne stood on the same podium and announced the creation of a new “Help to Grow” programme, that UKTI support for those exporting to China would double and that annual tax returns for businesses would be scrapped

When it came to Twitter, however, what is now known as Budget bingo became all the rage, and Brits immediately commented on Osborne’s attempt at added humour – kitchen jokes and a band of brothers reference galore.

This time around, Osborne was less focussed on entertaining and delivered the “emergency” Budget to (mostly) applause. But how was it relayed on Twitter, and in what way did the social media platform’s users react?

From the get-go, Twitter was awash with debate as the chancellor tweeted out a teaser an hour before he unveiled his plans.

It didn’t take like long for Twitter followers to notice what was wrong with the image.

Osborne opened up his second Budget of the year by claiming it was “for working people”. This was a fact that he mentioned twice in approximately 20 seconds. 

Read more from our summer Budget commentary:

It may not have gone as swimmingly as he hoped.

He may have also contradicted himself a little.

As always, the speech was first peppered with a few forecasts on the UK economy – last year Osborne had announced that the economy grew by three per cent rather than the expected 2.6 per cent. The summer Budget offered more good news.

But the next figures were not as well received.

The first “key judgement” of the Budget was about how fast to cut the deficit. The intended method:

That would mean that as a percentage of GDP, the deficit will fall from 3.7 per cent in 2015 to 2.2 per cent in 2016/17, then 1.2 per cent and so on, until it reaches 0.4 per cent in 2019/20. The response:

According to Tweeters, Osborne also has a favourite Budget quote: “We should fix the roof while the sun is shining.” Amazingly, he said it just as it started to rain outside – really.

Read on for further key announcements and to find out about the protesters shouting “balls to the Budget”.

There were some humorous tweets along the way:

Here are Osborne’s Budget announcements in the words of others.

Of course, what would the day have been without protesters taking to the streets and chanting “balls to the Budget”.