Ten 2014 HR shockers

Why is this so critical? Because businesses realise that the way we work has changed, the composition of the workforce is diverse, growth is back on the agenda and that critical new skills are scarce and unevenly distributed around the world. As a result, today’s companies have to manage people differently.

Yet a recent survey showed that even technology organisations are lacking the systems to support mission-critical HR services, with 76 per cent stating they urgently have to invest in this area this year.

Here is our top ten list of HR system shockers that came to light in conversations with global enterprises:

1. The CEO who submitted a form to change his bank account details three times and yet they still weren’t showing in the system.

2. A system that continues to pay people who have left the company but refuses to pay some current employees as the payroll system is not linked to the HR system.

3. Employees finding it easier to drive 20 miles to book their holiday on the system rather than using it remotely.

4. An organisation that can’t say how many people it employs.

5. Employees needing to know what a half of 7.325 in order to book holiday (7.325 hours is the working day).

6. Employees unable to update their personal details themselves but having to rely on their HR team to make changes.

7. An organisation that mislaid its external applications because it had no ability to store CVs in its HR system.

8. One organisation that described its salary planning as “the mother of all spreadsheets”.

9. The poor HR professional whose roll out of the new people management system ranked as “the worst experience of their life”.

10. A dated HR system operating since 2001, which can’t be turned off as it is the same system that controls access to the building.

Adam Hale is CEO of Fairsail.

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