Sales & Marketing

Ten marketing mistakes you could be making in your current campaign

8 min read

06 October 2017

It’s all well and good winging it on occasion; we all do it and it can work well. Sometimes. However, if you don’t have any end goals in sight or you haven’t set out any real KPIs to target,

You’ve taken the time to put a campaign together to showcase your brand – the last thing you want to appear are marketing mistakes.

Here, I’ve brought together ten classic marketing mistakes to be aware of, which will help ensure you promote your business in the best possible light.

(1) Not knowing your audience

When you’re putting together a top notch marketing campaign, it’s absolutely imperative that you understand who your audience is. Having detailed demographics and psychographics with nothing left up to guesswork is vital, especially as the majority of your cash will be relying on making appropriate impressions on those who would be interested in your business or product.

So to avoid falling into the world of marketing mistakes, ensure you do thorough market research before doing anything else; not only will this make targeting people easier, but it can also completely influence your campaign for the better.

(2) Playing it too safe

Another crucial thing to realise when considering marketing mistakes – n vo one in marketing gets rewarded for boring, “same-y” or safe campaigns. If you’re a company not willing to take a few risks, the marketing campaigns you create won’t go far and will often be forgotten in a sea of far more exciting ideas.

If your team comes up with an idea that you’re scared is too risqué, run it past a close family member or friend and gauge if it’s maybe a bit too “out there” by their reaction. And, of course, not being boring doesn’t have to mean controversy; there are other ways to wow and impress without potentially offending people along the way. There are times when working on the wording of a campaign can get you a five per cent bump in results, but working on the direction and strategy of the campaign with innovative and unique ideas could give a 500 per cent bump. Be brave. Be bold.

(3) Not having a real plan

It’s all well and good winging it on occasion; we all do it and it can work well. Sometimes. However, if you don’t have any end goals in sight or you haven’t set out any real KPIs to target, then you could end up throwing money into a campaign that will never work or one that has no distinguishable results other than marketing mistakes.

Before you even start coming up with tactics, you need to have a strategy in place. End goals, targets and a loose plan (at the very least) need to be set out to improve your chances of success.

(4) Being uncommunicative

This is possibly the biggest of marketing mistakes any person in charge of a campaign could be making. Not talking things over thoroughly with a client or the team, even if you know it’s something they do not want to hear, will lead to confusion and upset.

Without those conversations, there’s no way to correctly manage expectations and it makes improving the results far more difficult than it would be with real input across the teams.

Always talk over every element of the planned campaign, even if the conversation might be difficult. It’ll help make future conversations far easier and dramatically increases the chances of improving performance.

(5) Not measuring accurately

Getting great results for a well thought-out marketing campaign is great, but you need to have confidence in those results. When it comes to measuring your outcomes, it’s no good for you if you can’t see where these successes have come from.

Measuring your efforts is incredibly important. It not only gives you affirmation when you’re doing an amazing job, but it also allows you to see what works and what doesn’t, making it easier to iterate and improve.

(6) Going into it without a USP

Not every company has an obvious unique selling point; if you are one of these companies, search harder and find the one that makes you special. There will always be something that you do that other companies do not. Finding that USP for a marketing campaign will make everything so much easier.

(7) Not taking the time to listen

Putting together a successful marketing campaign is hard work and can take up a large chunk of your time, so it is easy to let things slip. Taking the time to listen to the team you’re working with should never be one of these things.

It’s imperative that you go into any new marketing campaign completely understanding what it is the brand needs and what everyone’s ideas are before you run into anything head first.

(8) Not giving SEO the time of day

There are still many companies who aren’t taking SEO seriously, which is a travesty. Getting higher organic visibility on search engines for key phrases people are actively searching for will lead to positive results.

It can be a big investment improving the performance of a site, be that in terms of time or money, but a solid marketing campaign will always incorporate methods to successfully do this.

(9) Not keeping up to date

The world of marketing is constantly playing catch up, as the needs and wants of those around us continually change, adapt and develop. This means that keeping up to date with evolving markets, trends, behaviours and staying up to date on how technological advancements are changing the information available to us is an absolute must.

Ensure you stay up to date on the needs and intents of your audience. Providing people with a better experience is vital to improving your performance.

(10) Not utilising conferences

There are so many people working in marketing that do not take advantage of the many conferences and workshops that are available to attend or even speak at.

These events can be incredibly useful for learning new vital skills and can even help with creative block! There’s no better inspiration than networking with others in the space and hearing about all the great things they’ve done either.

Mark Scully is founder of Learn Inbound, a marketing workshop and events specialist

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