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The £4.5bn traffic jam

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The pain and frustration of sitting in a traffic jam is synonymous with a Bank Holidays but new research has found that delay causing roadworks are costing businesses billions of pounds a year.

According to analysis from Lex Autolease, the leasing and fleet management provider which is part of Lloyds Banking Group, traffic delays on work-related car journeys costs businesses £4.5bn a year in lost working hours.

As part of its annual report on Company Motoring Lex Autolease found that in total employees spend around 70 million hours per week using their cars for work related journeys – defined as journeys deemed necessary for employees to carry out their role.
Those who drive on these journeys stated that they spend over a tenth, 13 per cent, of their time sitting in traffic jams.

Tim Porter, managing director of Lex Autolease, said: “Congestion is getting worse and is costing businesses millions of pounds every day in lost productivity. It is critical that the Government keeps investing in the road network to keep our workforce on the move.”

Of the 1,041 drivers surveyed, when asked about how long car-related commutes take, the average time for a return journey was estimated at 70 minutes each day – equivalent to over 10 full days per person per annum, showing that the daily commute can take up a significant amount of time over the course of a year. 

The research also revealed that five per cent of those interviewed commuted for more than three hours each day, while less than a tenth work from home and so have no commuting time at all. 

Porter added: “The workplace is changing rapidly, and many businesses are recognising the benefits of homeworking supported by improvements to technology such as fast broadband and video conferencing. Employees can enjoy increased flexibility in their working patterns and these are important steps in reducing congestion and helping businesses to become more flexible.”

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