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The evolution of John Lewis Christmas adverts over the past five years

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John Lewis can seemingly do no wrong.

It’s the retailer that’s desired by jobseekers, recognised for its corporate reputation among rivals, and keen to support startups and innovators.

Plus it loves Christmas.

You probably remember the firm’s festive advert in 2014 was centred around Monty the Penguin, which reached seven million views in 24 hours.

Man on the Moon is the company’s 2015 advert, which was released on 6 November, and #manonthemoon can be found trending on Twitter at the time of writing.

Given the popularity of the John Lewis campaigns, PR agency Hotwire has tracked the jolly firm’s Christmas adverts from the past five years (2011-2015) to break down consumers’ reactions across Twitter by the numbers.

2015 – Man on the Moon

In the first hour, there have been 16,396 mentions of #manonthemoon and #onthemoon, as well as 4,449 mentions of Aurora – the Norwegian singer featured on the advert. 11 per cent of tweets are positive as people say the “adorable” advert has a “beautiful message”, but two per cent are tweeting negatively and claim to be crying after watching it.

10 most compelling Christmas ads from UK high street retailers based on facial reactions

Hashtag popularity between 2011-2014

2014 – #montythepenguin – 97,257 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2013 – #bearandhare – 6,826 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2012 – #snowmanjourney – 649 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2011 – #thelongwait – data to low to measure accurately

Soundtrack popularity between 2011-2014

2014 – Tom Odell – 3,670 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2013 – Lily Allen – 3,303 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2012 – Gabrielle Aplin – 817 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch
2011 – Slow Moving Millie – 60 mentions over 24 hours on day of launch

However, it should be noted that Twitter has become more popular as the years have passed by, so more people will now be using the social network. Additionally, John Lewis didn’t provide an official hashtag in 2011 and 2012, thus mentions would have been skewed somewhat as consumers created their own.

Realising the community appetite for the Christmas campaigns, John Lewis introduced official hashtags in 2013 and beyond to give the marketing more impact, which has clearly paid off based on the numbers.

Have a look below at the advert to decide whether you’re in the positive or negative camp…


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