Top 11 marketing tips

1. Plug weather data into your online ads

If you sell umbrellas, you’ll sell more when it rains. The same is true for all sorts of firms, from snow shoe makers to travel agents. Even eBay does more activity when it rains and everyone is stuck indoors. This is why online advertising now allows you to include live weather data in your bidding algorithm. Fast Web Media offers one of the most popular weather data services. 

Mike Flynn, CEO of digital marketing firm Fast Web Media tells us: “Using a tool called weatherFIT, the specialist lingerie and clothing retailer Bravissimo boosted its online sales revenues from PPC ads for its swimwear range nearly 600 per cent in three months, by predicting weather conditions to target online shoppers looking for a new suit for their holidays.  Alongside its swimwear campaign, Bravissimo also used weatherFIT to promote its Pepperberry-branded range of dresses. This saw a sales increase of 78 per cent and an increase in average order size of 78 per cent compared with when weatherFIT was not used.”

2. Take social media seriously

Getting a bit jaded with Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn? You aren’t alone. But they do pay. Gary Seneviratne, co-founder of Adido, a fast growing digital-agency based in Bournemouth, says: “Social networks, like LinkedIn and Twitter, are a vital ingredient to build relationships and have conversations. But remember to make sure the people you’re talking to are the right people, people in your target audience. Be planned about it. We can attribute over 30 per cent sales lift, year on year, to having a strong networking strategy and presence.”

3. Use Facebook’s dedicated marketing tools

Virtual PA service Moneypenny’s commercial director Joanna Swash has got some great results simply by combining her database with Facebook’s standard services. She says: “Advertise on Facebook. Upload your email database into the Adverts Manager and create tailored retargeting campaigns. Results? We have seen Facebook click-through-rates double as a result and a lower cost per acquisition when looking at view-through conversions.”

4. Put videos on your website

This is something we resisted for ages,” admits Karen Meager, managing director, Monkey Puzzle Training & Consulting. Her reason? “Because, like so many people, we hate watching ourselves. But people buy from people and if they can get a sense of you from a video rather than just a photo this gives them a fuller picture of you and so it builds trust which is such an important part of doing good business. The video could be about your product and what it can do for people or it could be simply your own story, how you got into the business, what excites you about it. Be genuine and real. Don’t rehearse it too much. When we did this we saw an uplift of 45% on our website traffic.”

5. Give your service a catchy name

The service sector often struggles to convey its offerings to clients. Erika Clegg, co-founder of creative agency Spring, found this marketing technique to be invaluable. She says: “It’s hard to market a service, since the offering is often different from one case to the next and it has no physical form. It helps to productise services, therefore: to package them up with a brand name, a clear set of actions and standard anticipated outcomes. For my own company, a communications design agency, I have found it highly effective to brand sets of actions. 

The way we tackle projects is the Three Square Marketing Programme, for example, and each stage is clearly articulated in a diagram and document. This makes the new business process easier, and as a beneficial side effect also helps us to maintain standards and processes in house. Hyperlocal Everywhere, our community engagement research process and dossier, has attracted at least three significant new clients this year.”

Continue for tips six to 11…

Share this story

Close
Menu
Send this to a friend