Traditional advertising not connecting with Gen C

That’s according to a new report from infoMENTUM, which examined the growing digital marketing expectations of over 1,000 office workers throughout the UK.

Entitled ‘Generating success with Generation C’, the report considers the role of Gen C as both consumers and corporate employees. Unlike previous generations, the term Gen C does not describe a physical age bracket, but rather a ‘psychographic group’. 

As ‘digital natives’, they are always connected, always communicating, and, as the research findings suggest, have clear expectations from technology. Globally, most millennials are Gen C, but on average, 39 per cent of Gen C are aged 35 or over – as a result, this is a group that makes up a significant percentage of most marketplaces.

Key findings from the report suggest that 30 per cent of Gen C respondents are highly frustrated by online advertising. A further 83.5 per cent listed internet advertising techniques such as pop ups and auto-playing videos in their top five annoyances online. 

This frustration with advertising is largely a result of the two-way dialogue that social media has allowed Gen C to develop with their favourite brands. This two-way communication is rapidly becoming an expectation, with pop-ups and banner ads being considered not only old fashioned, but also an infringement on the browsing experience.

Although 86 per cent of Gen C are regularly using social media sites, only 1.5 per cent of those surveyed listed a lack of social media integration as a source of frustration. Similarly, a mere 12 per cent of respondents considered integrated social media feeds to be an important part of corporate websites. 

As an explanation for this contradiction, the report suggests that continuous access to multiple platforms has resulted in Generation C coming to expect original and varied content across each individual channel. As a result, marketers must focus on creating original output and be careful to avoid duplicating content across multiple feeds.

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