HR & Management

UK leaders are failing to recognise the efforts of staff

2 min read

02 March 2018

Research has found that beyond employee appreciation day, bosses are failing to recognise the efforts of staff. This leads to underperformance and a lack of engagement.

New research by The O.C. Tanner Institute has found that employers have actually been demotivating staff. Talking exclusively with Real Business, the company pointed out that 61 per cent of UK workers are going unappreciated. Some 68 per cent feel that even top performers are being handed the wrong end of the stick.

Its research was intended to coincide with employee appreciation day, with the company surveying 10,000 respondents across 12 countries. Of those, 1,102 were from the UK, spanning a range of jobs, industries and socio-economic backgrounds. All respondents were from companies with more than 500 employees.

“The findings revealed that too many UK companies are being neglectful when it comes to recognising the results and efforts of staff,” Robert Ordever, managing director of O.C. Tanner Europe, told Real Business. “The repercussions of this are significant, resulting in, amogst other things, high staff turnover, poor levels of engagement and underperformance.”

In fact, Ordever claimed there was a link to be drawn between a lack of staff appreciation and underperformance. Productivity has been growing at its quickest pace in six years. However, the UK still finds itself at the bottom of the G7 league table. It’s unsurprising, as the research found that just 46 per cent of UK workers thought they were encouraged to perform at their best standards.

Ordever further added of the research: “Staff appreciation needs to become an integral part of an organisation’s culture in order for it to make an impact. It needs to be frequent, timely, meaningful and sincere and encouraged on a daily basis.

“Leaders who ignore the importance of effective staff recognition will have workforces with low morale and who feel little connection to their places of work. Such organisations will struggle to hold onto talent, be lacking innovation and will likely have productivity issues.

“And so with such compelling reasons to embrace appreciation, perhaps today should be the day UK business leaders start to say “THANK YOU!”