What are the top ten unemployable traits?

Imagine the following situation:

*Sniff*.*Sniff-sniff.*
“What’s that smell?”
“What smell?”
“Oh…nevermind. (It’s him!)”

This is probably a conversation you’d rather avoid having with colleagues, right?

Britain’s bosses certainly think so. Research by HR consultancy Reabur found that bad personal hygiene would stop most business owners from hiring a potential employee.

The firm commissioned research to discover what traits – other than qualifications and experience – business owners believe make a person unemployable.

While 68 per cent of business owners would stop reject someone because of bad personal hygiene, some 56 per cent would let the potential employee’s dress sense affect their decision to hire them, too.

Nineteen per cent of employers agreed that they would be less likely to hire an individual that arrived late for an interview, and a further 12 per cent wouldn’t reschedule an interview if the individual couldn’t attend the initial time and date arranged.

“These results demonstrate that despite an increasing amount of legislation protecting applicants from being rejected for reasons other than their skills and experience, personal traits still appear to be a distinct factor in making a recruitment decision,” says Kirsty Burgess, co-managing director of Reabur.

If we’re honest, although it isn’t necessarily fair to judge someone by their appearance (and smell), it’s a reality that’s hard to get away from. No one wants to work with a smelly colleague.

Not only can it make the work environment unpleasant, but it can lead to extreme measures, as Detroit city workers have found out recently.

What are the other reasons why a boss would reject a potential employee?

  1. Poor personal hygiene – 68%
  2. Negative body language – 64%
  3. Poor speech and grammar – 59%
  4. Dress sense – 56%
  5. Bad attitude – 52%
  6. Excessive body piercing or tattoos – 49%
  7. Inappropriate sense of humour – 47%
  8. Accent – 44%
  9. Unattractive – 41%
  10. Poor employment history – 38%
Do you concur with these reasons? When hiring a potential employee, do you base yourself solely on their skills and experience, or do external factors count too? Leave your comments below.

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