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What you can learn from Britain’s Got Talent

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Marketing expert Jean Wolfe says it does. "The public in general want to believe in something or somebody at this time of doom and gloom which is why Britain’s Got Talent has been so phenomenally successful,” she says.

Wolfe has come up with eight tips for businesses from Britain’s Got Talent, the first of which is to never forget your audience.

She says: "If you or your products and service don’t appeal to the audience you don’t get the votes, the budget or the cash. But the biggest factor for success in addition to talent is about being authentic and letting your values and passion show. The more the audience feel they know you, the quicker they will believe you."

Wolfe’s eight reasons why Britain’s Got Talent is important for your business:

1. It reminds you that it is all about the audience. Unlike The Apprentice (apparently about business but more of a soap opera) the audience decides. It is the same in your business. They decide who they want to have the budget, the cash or the vote.

2. Talent and hard work take you most of the way, so you are ready for the opportunity. Susan Boyle said the only reason she was not famous was because she had not had the opportunity.

3. Talent and a story that touches the heart get you further. In Susan Boyle’s case, from an unknown village on to the Oprah show. Her story was the contrast between the appearance and the voice, for Diversity the dance troupe it was all about brothers and friends and inspired leadership, for Julian Smith it was that his saxophone his wife and his children were what he loved. Not a soundbite, but way of capturing the essence. We all need a peg to hang an idea on.

Most of the finalists had a wonderful story. The grandfather who got over the grief of his wife’s death and the grand-daughter who had more confidence when with him, the father and son who adored each other and the son knew his dad had not had a father in his own life, the little sister who ended up singing (not singing and dancing) and coped with her tears, the boy who learnt the moves in his bedroom…

Shaun had an amazing voice but didn’t have a really appealing story, and did not finish in the top three.

4. Tears, tantrums and weakness do not mean the end. Susan’s tantrums and Hollie’s tears did not make the public or the judges reject them. In fact the opposite happened. Things go wrong. Recovering from a mistake is what matters.

5. Telling the truth makes a difference. When Simon Cowell makes a critical comment he may get boos, but you can feel the truth of it. Everyone listens to what Simon says with closer attention because he does not hold back. He provides leadership. He preferred Diversity to their closest competition, while Piers Morgan preferred Flawless.  Diversity won. Leadership is important.  You may be booed by some but you will have more authority and more people will trust you.

6. Choose the right song at the final. Sing a whole range of songs to see what fits,  but go with the right one at the end. Your song in business is a mix of what you do, how you do it and why it is right for you.

7. The name is important. Britain’s Got Talent proved to be even more accurate this year, as the finalists were a specially talented group. Call your business and your products and services the right name and it will do the work for you.

8. What’s happening in the wider world can help. Piers Morgan told Susan Boyle she had given the world something to believe in. The doom and gloom all around probably contributed to Susan’s fame. Home cooking, home grown vegetables and home grown talent are all part of a new ethos, which has contributed to the unprecedented coverage of this year’s Britain’s Got Talent.

Do you agree or disagree? Add your comments below

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