Why Cameron gets my business vote

On the day the election was announced, you could tell the relative levels of confidence of the three leaders just by watching their body language.

Gordon Brown surrounded himself with the Cabinet – all a discreet distance behind him. He should remember the famous words of Sir Humphrey Appleby from the famous BBC Yes Minister series: “You’ve got to get right behind somebody before you can stab them in the back!” Having the Cabinet with him on the launch of the election was the only way Brown could check they weren’t plotting against him!

Let’s remember that Labour was re-elected five years ago, with Tony Blair promising to serve “a full term”. Two years later, he was gone, shafted by his own Chancellor. Since then, there have been several coup attempts against Brown. When ministers should have been running the country, they were plotting and fighting between themselves.

Next, the Liberal Democrats. Young Nick Clegg launched his campaign with a wily old Vince Cable beside him. Old Vince was widely applauded by the media for his performance in the Chancellors’ debate on Channel 4. But it wasn’t widely known that he got some of his facts wrong, stating the Lib Dems would restrict child benefit when it wasn’t party policy, for example. Vince gets a lot of credibility because it doesn’t get any scrutiny. If you examine his economic policies, he is widely out of step with public on one of the most important issues: giving up the pound and joining the euro. If we had followed Liberal Democrat policy, we’d be in the Euro zone now, and our taxes would be bailing out the Greek, Spanish, Portuguese, Irish and Italian economies.

Finally, the Conservatives. David Cameron’s election launch was a confident performance just near the Pimlico Plumbers headquarters on the South Bank with Parliament in the background. He has gained the support of key newspapers, with the Sun offering a typical tongue-in-cheek headline: “D-Dave”. Labour attacks him because he went to a posh school – but why should going to Britain’s best school and Britain’s best university be a disqualification for being our prime minister? Surely we all want well-educated, articulate and intelligent leaders, no matter what our background? We all benefit from someone with brains running the country!

I decided a year ago that I was going to support the Conservatives after I was lucky enough to meet George Osborne and David Willetts and hear their ideas and policies without the translation of an economically illiterate media. If you are still undecided, consider the following positions:

  • If you’re in business there will be no national insurance rise, which means the jobs you create won’t be taxed any more than they already are;
  • The property market will get a boost by abolishing stamp duty for nine out of ten first-time buyers;
  • If you earn between £20,000 and £40,000 a year, you won’t have to pay Labour’s national insurance rise and could be up to £150 a year better off;
  • In a relative dies and leaves you their house, you’ll only have to pay inheritance tax if you’re a millionaire;
  • There will be a war on waste as the Tories set about cutting Britain’s structural budget deficit. Immediately – not in four years’ time;
  • The bankers (I call them crooks in suits!) won’t have Gordon Brown’s toy-town regulator, the Financial Services Authority. Instead, they will be regulated by an organisation that understands banking – the Bank of England; and
  • Businesses like mine, which train apprentices to become decent trades people, welcome the Conservatives’ annual limit on the number of immigrants, which would balance our economy and introduce a sense of fair play to the system. Cheap labour through uncontrolled immigration has been a problem for years.
That’s just a taste of what Cameron offers. Labour is out of steam, out of ideas and out of time. I predict the Conservatives will win – if they don’t, I might as well end any thoughts on growing my business and go back on the tools!

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