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Women now make up 20% of FTSE 100 boardrooms

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Lord Davies of Abersoch’s report, alongside Cranfield University School of Management’s Female FTSE Board, showed that in order to reach the government’s 25 per cent target by 2015, fewer than 50 new women appointments need to be made.

Furthermore, women now account for 25 per cent of non-executive directorships and just under seven per cent of executive directorships.

Business secretary Vince Cable said: “These latest figures show that businesses are getting the right mix of talent around their boardroom table and understand the importance of this.

“But we will only achieve this if there is a renewed, concentrated effort by Chairs and CEOs to continue to change the make up of management at their top table.
More needs to done to improve the number of women in executive positions. These will be the CEOs of tomorrow and businesses still aren’t tapping into the vast talent pool available to them.”

Minister for women and equalities, Maria Miller, added: “It makes clear economic sense for women to be able to rise to the top. Good progress is being made in Britain through a cultural shift that promotes on merit, not through the mandatory quotas advocated by others.”

According to the reports, currently only two FTSE 100 companies, Glencore Xstrata and Antofagasta, have all-male boards.

Real Business on the hunt for this year’s inspirational, trailblazing women. To enter the First Women Awards – or nominate someone else view the online site or email beth.smith@caspianmedia.com. 

Entry deadline: Friday April 4, 2014.

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