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Want your eureka moment? Sleep on it

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According to a survey of 2,000 people by online print and design company MOO, 27 per cent of people came up with their business brainstorms while in bed. Work was –perhaps reassuringly – in second place at 18 per cent, while the shower and car were cited as other good places to let your creative juices flow.

You may be one of many who settles down for a good night’s sleep, only to find their brain won’t switch off. Instead, you’re struck with an existential crisis and you’re also suddenly bursting with all the ideas you should’ve had during your meeting that morning.

Apparently, we’re also more creative when we’re tired and our brains aren’t functioning as effectively. Our brains don’t do so well at filtering out distractions and remembering connections between ideas when we’re out of energy. This actually means it’s a good time to get creative, as you’re probably a bit more open to thinking in different ways and linking concepts you may never have thought could work together.

So, you may want to keep a handy notebook by the bed just in case you’re someone who has their eureka moment while counting sheep.

In the past year, adults have conjured up over 100 million ideas for creative and business projects – four every second, and the younger demographics was feeling most inspired according to MOO. Nearly one in five of those between 16 and 24 had already started working on their new venture.

Read more on finding inspiration:

Richard Moross, CEO of MOO, said: “I’m delighted that people are finding inspiration in a variety of creative and business projects and are beginning to put these plans into action.”

He added that entrepreneurs and creatives were “the lifeblood of our economy and deserve all the support we can give them”.

Many had an idea based around arts and crafts as well as cooking and baking, while technology was lower down the list – trailing education, reselling and design as areas where budding businesspeople had their ideas.

Unsurprisingly, passion or an interest in a particular area was the motivation behind the majority of creative projects – a third said that was what sparked off their decision to follow a project in a particular sector. Close behind was spotting a gap in the current market – where 30 per cent said they were struck with a valuable idea that could really make a difference. Similarly, frustration with existing products had around a fifth of people getting their thinking caps on.

Philanthropic determination was also a feature on the list – over ten per cent said a determination to change life for the better led to them coming up with an idea.

If you’re thinking of relocating, Birmingham, Cardiff and London were the areas where residents had the highest proportion of new ideas. It might just be easier to hop into bed though.

Image: Shutterstock

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